WYSO

Karen Kasler (Ohio Public Radio)

Karen Kasler is a lifelong Ohioan with a passion for broadcast reporting. She left her hometown of Lancaster for Otterbein College. As News Director at WCBE in Columbus in the 90s, she covered a variety of events, including the local impact of the Gulf War, the financial problems of the Columbus Public Schools and the trouble-ridden Ameriflora exhibition in 1992.

Karen was selected as a Fellow in the Kiplinger Master's Program for Mid-Career Journalists at The Ohio State University in 1994. After a brief stint at WBNS-TV in Columbus, she moved to Cleveland and became the afternoon drive anchor and assignment editor for WTAM-AM. Karen followed the demolition and rebuilding of Cleveland Browns Stadium, produced award-winning series on identity theft and the Y2K panic, covered the Republican National Convention in 2000 and the blackout of 2003, and reported annually from the Cleveland National Air Show each year, often going upside down in an aerobatic plane to do it. In 1999, she was a media witness to the execution of Wilford Berry, at the time the first man put to death since Ohio re-instated capital punishment. Karen frequently reported for ABC Radio News, and also co-produced an award-winning nationally-distributed documentary on the one-year anniversary of September 11, 2001, which featured her interview with Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge from the West Wing of the White House.

Since returning to Columbus, she's covered major elections and the controversies surrounding them, the "Coingate" scandal and the resignation of former Attorney General Marc Dann. She's also produced features on "green" business, STEM education, campaign ads, the elimination of the state's anti-smoking agency and a demolition derby involving farm equipment.

Each year she anchors the Bureau's live coverage of the governor's State of the State. She was a panelist for the gubernatorial and the US Senate debates in 2006 and the Attorney General's race in 2008, and has also been interviewed by NPR, by the BBC and by Brian Williams for NBC's "Nightly News".

Karen has been honored by the Association of Capitol Editors and Reporters, the Cleveland Press Club/Society of Professional Journalists, the Ohio Educational Telecommunications Commission, and holds a National Headliner Award. She's won several awards from the Ohio AP, and is a four-time winner of the AP's Best Broadcast Writing award. She was nominated for an Emmy in 2006 for hosting "The State of Ohio". She's currently the president-elect of the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters.

Karen joined the Bureau in March 2004. She’s reported for NPR, Marketplace and the Great Lakes Radio Consortium, and is a frequent guest on ONN’s “Capitol Square” , WVIZ’s “Ideas” and WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”.

Karen is also an adjunct professor at Capital University in Columbus. Karen, her husband and their son Jack live on Columbus' northeast side.

Statehouse News Bureau

Budget, taxes, education, drugs - Governor John Kasich covered a lot of ground in his State of the State speech in Sandusky.

CAIR

The Council on American Islamic Relations says it wants investigators looking into vandalism found at a Columbus area mosque on Friday to consider it a hate crime.

The Columbus chapter of CAIR says surveillance video caught a man vandalizing the Ahlul Bayt Islamic Center on Columbus’ northwest side. CAIR-Columbus legal director Roman Iqbal said the man in a car painted with pro-Trump messages scrawled anti-Islamic graffiti on the mosque’s door. 

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted
Statehouse News Bureau

Worries about hacking and cybercrime resulted in the federal Department of Homeland Security naming voting machines and elections systems around the country as “critical infrastructure”, and therefore eligible for more federal help to protect them. 

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted said he’s not sure what this designation means – and whether it gives the federal government authority to do something that it didn’t have power to do before. He says wants more information in writing.

Text of Gov Kasich’s veto on Heartbeat bill
Andy Chow

Gov. John Kasich has signed one abortion ban, but vetoed another one. 

Kasich used his line-item veto power and struck down the so-called “Heartbeat Bill”, which would ban abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat could be detected. But he left the child abuse bill that ban was attached to intact.

If the Heartbeat Bill had become law, it would be the strictest abortion ban in the country, and many critics said it was unconstitutional. But Kasich signed another ban that would outlaw abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Karen Kasler

The head of the Ohio Republican Party is likely to have a challenger to his re-election to that position next month.

Ohio Republican Party chair Matt Borges raised concerns about Donald Trump several times, and Trump’s campaign had blasted Borges personally at one point. Former Ohio Republican Party chair Kevin DeWine hinted a few weeks ago that Borges could be in trouble. “It’s kinda hard when there appears to be such an adversarial relationship between the President-elect and the state party it seems like maybe change is in the offing.”

jcaputo4

Democrats say they’ll appeal a decision announced yesterday in a case involving activities planned near polling places on Tuesday by Donald Trump’s campaign.

The decision overturns a Friday afternoon ruling from a federal judge in Cleveland, who issued a restraining order against the Trump campaign to stop conduct that Democrats feared could harass or intimidate voters on Election Day.

Ken "kcdsTM" / Flickr

Gun regulation is an issue has been a challenging one for both major party candidates in the US Senate race between incumbent Republican Sen. Rob Portman and Democratic former Gov. Ted Strickland. In the last installment of a three part series, the Statehouse News Bureau is breaking down the race issue-by-issue. Correspondent Karen Kasler examines the candidates’ somewhat complicated positions on guns.

Some observers feel Ohio’s US Senate contest is all but over, with incumbent Rob Portman leading Democratic former Gov. Ted Strickland by around 15 points. But the candidates are continuing their tour of the state with three debates – the first was Friday in Youngstown, and last night they met in Columbus.

Statehouse News Bureau

The rift between the Trump campaign on the chair of the Ohio Republican Party became what appears to be a full-blown war this weekend.

It’s no secret Matt Borges has had concerns about Donald Trump as the party’s nominee. But Trump’s Ohio campaign chair Bob Paduchik suggested this was personal in his letter to the Ohio Republican Party’s state central committee.

The letter blasted the chairman for promoting himself as a possible future head of the Republican National Committee with what Paduchik called “an apparently insatiable need for publicity”.

The first of three debates between the two major party candidates for US Senate got heated very quickly, as Democratic challenger Ted Strickland, who trails Republican Sen. Rob Portman by double digits, went on the attack. 

The first question in the debate on WMFJ in Youngstown was about trade, and Portman used his answer as an opportunity to refute the blasts Strickland launched against him in his opening argument, saying the former governor doesn’t want to talk about his record.

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