Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Backers of a plan to allow voters to approve a constitutional amendment that would legalize marijuana use and allow production of hemp have taken the first step to put it on the ballot.  Tonya Davis with Responsible Ohioans for Cannabis says the proposal would de-criminalize recreational use of marijuana in Ohio. 

"We just believe that they need to stop wasting our tax dollars on arresting and harassing and tearing up families for something that is safer than aspirin”

A federal court has ruled in favor of a gay couple who wants their marriage in another state recognized here in Ohio.

Attorneys representing homeless Ohioans and others who have traditionally encountered identification problems while voting are asking a federal court to keep a ruling on the books for future elections. Ohio lawmakers had once considered a bill that would require Ohioans to have a valid driver’s license or state issued photo I-d to vote. But that plan didn’t go anywhere, in part because advocates for the poor insisted their clients don’t have that kind of i-d and forcing them to get it just to vote would amount to a poll tax. There are several forms of identification that can be used.

Ohio’s Former Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents is taking a new job. Eric Fingerhut has been named the President and CEO of the Hillel Foundation, an organization that helps Jewish college aged students. Fingerhut says he’s excited about this new possibility.

"I feel so blessed to have this opportunity to bring together the two passions of my life – education and my connection to the Jewish world," says Fingerhut.  Nothing would make me happier than for this to be the job that  spend the rest of my professional career in and make a difference everyday."

Medicaid rally participants 2013
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Hundreds of advocates for low income Ohioans packed into the Statehouse on Tuesday for a rally to urge lawmakers to expand Medicaid.  It’s the latest in an ongoing fight between Republican legislative leaders who don’t want to expand Medicaid and Governor Kasich, who backs the idea.   But Democratic State Representative Mike Foley says the Governor needs to do more to get majority lawmakers to pass Medicaid expansion now.

One of Ohio’s former top Republican office holders is supporting the effort to overturn Ohio’s ban on gay marriage.

Republican Jim Petro is well known in Ohio politics.  He’s served as Ohio’s Attorney General, State Auditor, Chancellor of Ohio Regents, and a state lawmaker.  Now he’s taking a stand in a hot button political issue.  Petro is working with the group that wants to put an issue on the ballot next year that would allow Ohioans to vote to overturn the state’s constitutional ban on gay marriage.

Ohio’s budget was a big victory for Ohio Right to Life as five bills it supported were attached to the state’s new two year fiscal plan. But NARAL Pro Choice Ohio says the fight isn’t over.

Ohio Right to Life President Mike Gonadakis is pretty pleased now that Republican Governor John Kasich has signed a budget that includes five anti abortion amendments.

A left leaning think tank says the proposed two year state budget would help private and charter schools but would hurt public schools.

Innovation Ohio’s Dale Butland says public schools are the big losers in the Republican backed budget plan that’s on the table right now.

"Most of them will get less money than they did in the 2010-11 budget and about 25% of our schools will get less than they did in the 2012-13 budget," says Butland.

Ohio lawmakers have come to an agreement on a new tax reform plan that they say is fair and will help all Ohioans. The plan will provide income tax breaks to nearly all Ohioans but will raise some taxes and shift some tax burdens.

Republican Senate President Keith Faber says the tax plan Senators and House member have agreed upon is fair to all Ohioans and accomplishes a major goal.

"The number one thing that this plan does that former plans have not – this is sustainable, it is balanced and it does not rely on one time money," says Faber.

Some Ohio doctors and medical clinic managers say if the Ohio legislature passes some anti-abortion bills now under consideration, it’s very possible there will be a shortage of doctors and medical facilities to serve the needs of Ohio women. And they warn more Ohio women will die due to complications from pregnancies.

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