WYSO

Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

David Givens
Dan Konik

When opioid addicts try to put their lives back together, it is often difficult to get the housing, jobs, continuing treatment and personal connections they need to stay clean and be successful. As part of Ohio Public Radio’s series on the opioid crisis, Jo Ingles reports on what is being done to help drug abusers get on the right track.

Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray is announcing he’ll step down from that post before the end of the month. That’s thought by many to signal that he’s running for Governor.

The amount of money being spent by drug companies to defeat Issue 2, the so-called Drug Price Relief Act, has broken the state's record for the most spent on a ballot issue. Backers of that plan have brought in around $14 million so far, but the drug company-funded campaign to defeat Issue 2 has raised $58 million dollars. That big money could yield big results.

Statehouse News Bureau

The failure of the U.S. Senate’s proposed plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Health Care Act leaves the program intact. But most Senators, on both sides of the aisle, say if the program is kept, changes must be made to make it function on a long term basis. 

Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman voted for one version of the proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Health Care Act. He said it included provisions that he thinks would shore up the program.

Jo Ingles

Some of the officers that enforce liquor laws in Ohio are being trained to fight more than illegal serving or drinking. 

Gov. John Kasich says 80 undercover agents from the Ohio Investigative Unit, the agency that investigates liquor, tobacco and food stamp fraud, are being trained to spot the signs of human trafficking.

“If you have your eyes on what’s happening, you may prevent somebody from being taken and abused and have long term ramifications,” said Kasich.

Abortion protestors at Ohio Statehouse recently
Jo Ingles

A controversial abortion bill that Governor Kasich vetoed at the end of last year has been reintroduced in the Ohio legislature. 

The so-called “heartbeat bill”, legislation that would ban abortions at the point a fetal heartbeat can be detected, has become a staple in the legislature in recent years. Last year, lawmakers narrowly passed the legislation, but Gov. John Kasich vetoed it when it reached his desk.

Andy Chow/Statehouse News Bureau

The leader of Democrats in the Ohio Senate is stepping down. He’ll be replaced with a familiar face. 

Senate Minority Leader Joe Schiavoni of the Youngstown area says he’s stepping down so he can devote the time necessary to run to be his party’s nominee for Governor in 2018. He’s among three announced Democratic candidates right now.

Ohio Governor John Kasich
Office of Ohio Governor John Kasich

Governor John Kasich’s State of the State Speech is getting praise from his Republican colleagues in the legislature. But Democrats are not on board. 

House and Senate Republicans praised Kasich’s plans, saying they'll help Ohio’s communities. Kasich proposes using $20 million in high tech Third Frontier funds to come up with new ways to fight opioid abuse by developing new treatments and technologies. House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger says he wants details on that.

Office of Governor John Kasich

Governor John Kasich is implementing rule changes for the way medical professionals can prescribe opioids. This plan comes just one day after majority Republicans in the House announced a bill that would accomplish many of the same goals. 

Kasich’s plan would enact rule changes to limit opioid prescriptions to a 7-day supply for an adult and a 5-day supply for children. He’s adamant these changes are going into effect soon and don’t need legislative approval.

Statehouse New Bureau

President Donald Trump says he thinks millions of illegal votes were cast in the November election though there hasn’t been any confirmation of that. So he is calling for a major investigation to look into votes, particularly those in California and New York.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted says there is no reason for the federal government to focus on ballots cast here because his office already does post-election investigations into claims of voter fraud and suppression.

“We’ve done one after each general election since I’ve been Secretary of State,” he says.

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