Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

ResponsibleOhio

The group behind this fall’s proposed amendment to legalize marijuana has a controversial new mascot.

The new ResponsibleOhio mascot is named Buddie, and he looks like a cross between Oscar the Grouch and Popeye the Sailor man – a green bushy head, meant to resemble a “bud” of pot, atop a bodybuilder’s physique.

ResponsibleOhio this week kicked off an RV tour of the state to promote its marijuana legalization initiative.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Attorneys for ResponsibleOhio, the group backing the constitutional amendment to legalize marijuana on the ballot this fall, say they’re taking the state to court.

On Tuesday the Ballot Board set the wording for Issue 3, the proposed amendment that establishes ten growing sites and would set regulations for pot sale and use in Ohio.  And Don McTigue, attorney for ResponsibleOhio, doesn’t like the ballot language.

A proposal to drug test Ohioans who receive state assistance is making its way around the Statehouse again. Though this time, there is a difference in the measure.

Republican Representative Tim Schaeffer’s bill to drug test Ohioans receiving assistance didn’t go anywhere in two previous general assemblies but this time around, he says this bill is not punitive. He says instead of taking benefits away, Ohioans on the Ohio Works First program who test positive under this bill would be given drug treatment while their dependents could still receive the benefits.

A recent study shows a dentists shortage already exists in rural areas.
User: Conor Lawless / Flickr/Creative Commons

A new report shows Ohio is likely to experience a shortage of dentists in the future. And that’s a big reason why some people say the state has to change rules for dentists, hygienists and dental therapists now.

David Maywhoor with Dental Access Now says a new study shows there’s already a shortage in rural areas and that will get worse.

“In 2012, Ohio had 6,260 dentists. By 2025, the number of dentists in our state will be just 5,887. So Ohio will be short 627 dentists to meet the demand in 2025,” he said.

Fireworks could cause problems for some veterans this weekend.
User: Taylor Burnes / Flickr/Creative Commons

Many will be celebrating America’s independence and the veterans who fought for it this holiday weekend. But some Ohioans might also do something that causes those same veterans a great deal of grief.

Wikipedia

The Supreme Court has ruled Arizona can allow an independent commission created there to oversee the drawing of congressional district lines. The ruling could means changes to Ohio's districts. 

Common Cause Ohio leader Sam Gresham says he expected the court to rule in favor of Arizona’s proposed redistricting plan.

“It was just a delaying tactic on the part of people. There’s nothing in there that prevents it,” Gresham said.

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

The State Senate has released its version of Ohio's budget. The chamber plans to send $71.3 billion over two years, which is about one billion less than both the House and Gov. John Kasich's proposed spending plans. 

Senate President Keith Faber of Celina is happy with his caucus’ proposal – which he says has a smaller bottom line than the previous two budget plans. Tax cuts are the big feature in the proposal.  

“We are continuing today to build on our commitment to fund what matters and return to the taxpayers what’s not essential,” Faber said.

Attorney General Mike DeWine made the settlement announcement during a news conference Wednesday. Ohio Dept. of Transportation Director Jerry Wray was at his side.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Many of Ohio’s cities and townships will soon be getting a check from a court settlement with companies that provide road salt.

Under the agreement, the Morton and Cargill companies will pay a combined $11.5 million. Most of the money will be distributed to local governments that Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine says spent too much on road salt for about a decade.

College students from around the state are telling Senators at the Statehouse to put more need based funding for students in their upcoming budget proposal.

Just a few days ago, Rachael Collyer graduated from Ohio State University.  And now, when many students are thinking about their future, she’s worried about paying off about $27,000 in student loans. She wants state lawmakers to provide some debt relief for students like her in the upcoming state budget.

An Ohio lawmaker is working on a bill that would require law enforcement officers throughout the state to wear body cameras. The legislation is coming soon.

Democratic State Rep. Kevin Boyce says 30 other states are considering requiring police officers to wear body cameras and he wants Ohio to be number 31.

“The whole idea is that to better protect our law enforcement officers who work to protect us every day and also to continually find ways to strengthen the integrity of the process where police officers interact with the public,” Boyce said.

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