Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted
Statehouse News Bureau

If you have an Ohio driver’s license but are not registered to vote, you should be getting something in your mailbox soon from Ohio’s elections chief.

Secretary of State Jon Husted says the state’s voter rolls system is now linked with the Bureau of Motor Vehicles database, so he’s now able to make sure Ohio drivers can be voters if they want.

Once again, a bill that would allow Ohioans to opt out of union representation for public sector jobs has been introduced at the Ohio Statehouse.

Republican Rep. John Becker says unions wouldn’t have to represent government workers under his plan, “The major provision, of course, is just an opt-out for public sector employees that they don’t have to join a union if they don’t want to and would not have to pay any type of dues.”

Abortion rights supporters
Jo Ingles

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled against a Texas law that required doctors performing abortions in the Lone Star state to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and required abortion clinics to meet standards for ambulatory surgical centers.  How does that ruling affect Ohio?

State lawmakers have put in place restrictions on Ohio abortion clinics that are similar to those in Texas. So the leader of NARAL Pro Choice Ohio, Kellie Copeland, says the Supreme Court’s ruling against the state of Texas is a victory for abortion clinics in Ohio too.

Andy Chow

It’s not just the presidential contest that’s close in Ohio - a new poll shows the race for the U.S. Senate is tied, with a little under five months to go before the election.

The Quinnipiac University poll shows Republican Senator Rob Portman and Democratic challenger, former Governor Ted Strickland, tied at 47 percent. The poll shows Portman leads with men and whiter and older voters, while Strickland leads with women, minorities and younger voters. 

Governor Kasich votes in March 2016 primary
Karen Kasler

Gov. John Kasich has vetoed a bill that would have required voters to post a cash bond if they want a court to order polling places to stay open late on Election Day.

Earlier in the week, Kasich said he was thinking about the bill. On one hand, he said he agreed it was important to make sure a judge’s decision to keep polls open late was based on a real problem.

“We don’t want a judge, just because of some sort of pressure, to open something open just because of Twitter or Facebook or whatever.”

Jo Ingles

The state of Ohio has settled its legal battle with Planned Parenthood, agreeing to pay thousands in legal fees and to not enforce controversial rules on disposing of remains of abortions.

Under a federal court agreement, the state will pay more than $45,000 in legal fees for Planned Parenthood. Attorney General spokesman Dan Tierney says the deal reached back in December also said the state would not enforce a health department rule involving disposal of fetal remains.

Ohio Attorney General, Mike DeWine
www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov

Attorney General Mike DeWine has answered a question that has been asked of him many times in recent months. DeWine says he’s running for governor in 2018.

DeWine says he intends to run but says he doesn’t really want to talk about it right now.

“It certainly is no secret that I’m very much interested in running for Governor in 2018 but I think it’s just too early to be making that formal announcement," said DeWine.  "We need to get this election behind us and people, I think, should be focusing on this election. It’s very, very important.”

Andy Chow/Statehouse News Bureau

After nearly twenty years of trying, backers of a bill to allow medical marijuana in the Buckeye state are celebrating a historic vote by the Ohio Legislature, and is headed to the governor.

Democratic Senator Kenny Yuko has been pushing for medical marijuana legislation for years, and he was given the opportunity to preside over the Senate for the historic vote.

The slim 18-15 victory came without the support of Republican Senate president Keith Faber, who says he had a lot of concerns about the plan, though it had been backed by Republican leaders in the House.

Statehouse News Bureau

Cleveland City Council is introducing legislation to set the minimum wage at $15. Throughout the state and the country, there are repeated calls for increasing the minimum wage.

Democratic State Representative Kent Smith wants to raise Ohio’s minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, giving more than a million Ohioans a raise.

“And 2.1 billion would get circulated in the Ohio economy.”

But John Barker, the head of the Ohio Restaurant Association, says many of his members already pay above the $8.10 state minimum wage but going higher could cause inflation.

Planned Parenthood is suing the state over a new law that would take federal dollars that fund cancer screenings, HIV tests and more away from the organizations.

Planned Parenthood is asking a federal district court to allow federal funds to continue to come to the organization for health screenings, infant mortality programs and other services. Iris Harvey is with the Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio.

“Our commitment to our patients has never wavered. And we file suit today because we will not allow politics to stand in the way of our patients and the care they need.”

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