Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Ohio statehouse
thoth188

Ohio lawmakers have finally come to a bipartisan agreement on redistricting that many are calling historic. The process of drawing lines for legislative districts has been controversial in the past, but an agreement passed in the Senate Friday will be sold to Ohioans as a way to make that process more fair.

“This is the most significant bi-partisan activity that I have been involved in in my time here in the House and the general assembly,” said Democratic State Representative Vernon Sykes, who’s leaving after 26 years in the statehouse.

Ohio State Rep. Peter Beck has resigned from the Ohio House.
ohiohouse.gov

A Republican state representative from the Cincinnati area is resigning. 

State Rep. Peter Beck has resigned effective Nov. 30. He was not going to represent his Southwest Ohio area much longer anyway since he was defeated by another Republican last month. 

But Beck’s resignation is noteworthy since he has been accused of helping to scam investors by misleading them about a start-up software company he knew was insolvent. Beck faces a trial later this month on 69 felony counts including fraud, theft, perjury, money laundering and receiving stolen property.

Backers of the controversial measure called the "heartbeat bill" being considered in the Ohio House are trying a new strategy to get Ohio lawmakers to pass it during the lame duck session. The bill would make abortion illegal at the point a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

A BB gun/pistol with a realistic look. This one is tagged with an orange tip to indicate it's not a real gun.
Bryce Mullet / Flickr/Creative Commons

One state lawmaker says toy guns look too much like real guns. Democratic House Representative Alicia Reece is introducing a bill that she says would make BB guns, air rifles and airsoft guns sold in Ohio more easily distinguishable.

“It would look at color strip, would look at changing the color and at some point would look at changing the look of a gun," she said.

kristen_a / Flickr Creative Commons

Abortion is likely the first thing that comes to many people’s minds when they hear the words, women’s issues. But that’s only one issue women are concerned about. In fact, there are other issues that many women say are more significant to them. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports on what those women want and how they are going about the process of getting it.

Linus Bohman / Flickr Creative Commons

Getting a driver’s license has traditionally been one of the things sixteen year olds look forward to doing once they blow out the candles on their birthday cakes. But a new study suggests more teens are waiting until they are a little older these days to get a license.

Delaware area resident Seamus O’Flaherty didn’t rush out to take driver’s ed classes when he turned sixteen.

“My brain wasn’t ready.”

O’Flaherty says he felt like he needed a little more time to learn everything he needed to know before getting behind the wheel.  So he waited a year.

The organization that represents elections officials throughout Ohio has not taken a position on the federal court’s most recent ruling on changes to the state’s elections laws. Last week the court ordered the state to go back to some of the early voting options that were in place in 2010, but have since been eliminated by new laws. Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted plans to appeal the ruling, but Aaron Oeckerman with the Ohio Association of Election Officials says his group didn’t ask Husted to do that.

Juliet Fromholt

A group of conservative Ohio lawmakers thinks it’s time the legislature pass a bill under consideration that would require voters to show a valid driver’s license or state issued photo ID before they can cast a ballot.

The past week hasn’t been kind to Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald, the Democrat running for Ohio Governor. He answered some uncomfortable questions about incidents that have surfaced in various news reports, but hasn’t responded to more questions that have come up. His problems are raising questions about what, if anything, this will mean to other Democrats running for statewide office.

The Ohio Department of Veterans Services is trying to get the word out about cash bonuses available to vets who have served since September 11, 2001.

A spokesman for the department says 81,000 Ohio vets have already received bonuses totaling tens of millions of dollars, but an important deadline is approaching: This is the last year for veterans who served in Iraq between March 2003 and December of 2011 to apply for the bonus.

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