WYSO

Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Andy Chow/Statehouse News Bureau

The leader of Democrats in the Ohio Senate is stepping down. He’ll be replaced with a familiar face. 

Senate Minority Leader Joe Schiavoni of the Youngstown area says he’s stepping down so he can devote the time necessary to run to be his party’s nominee for Governor in 2018. He’s among three announced Democratic candidates right now.

Ohio Governor John Kasich
Office of Ohio Governor John Kasich

Governor John Kasich’s State of the State Speech is getting praise from his Republican colleagues in the legislature. But Democrats are not on board. 

House and Senate Republicans praised Kasich’s plans, saying they'll help Ohio’s communities. Kasich proposes using $20 million in high tech Third Frontier funds to come up with new ways to fight opioid abuse by developing new treatments and technologies. House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger says he wants details on that.

Office of Governor John Kasich

Governor John Kasich is implementing rule changes for the way medical professionals can prescribe opioids. This plan comes just one day after majority Republicans in the House announced a bill that would accomplish many of the same goals. 

Kasich’s plan would enact rule changes to limit opioid prescriptions to a 7-day supply for an adult and a 5-day supply for children. He’s adamant these changes are going into effect soon and don’t need legislative approval.

Statehouse New Bureau

President Donald Trump says he thinks millions of illegal votes were cast in the November election though there hasn’t been any confirmation of that. So he is calling for a major investigation to look into votes, particularly those in California and New York.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted says there is no reason for the federal government to focus on ballots cast here because his office already does post-election investigations into claims of voter fraud and suppression.

“We’ve done one after each general election since I’ve been Secretary of State,” he says.

Two $1 Bills
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio’s minimum wage is set to increase on January 1st.
 
A voter approved constitutional amendment a few years ago means the required pay for most minimum wage workers will increase by five cents an hour - or about $2.00 for a 40-hour week. The increase is tied to inflation.

Andy Chow

There weren’t any surprises inside the Ohio Statehouse today as the state’s 18 electors have cast their ballots for Republican President-Elect Donald Trump. But it wasn’t a day without controversy.

When the state’s electors arrived for their noon gathering at the Statehouse, they were greeted by about 200 protestors.

They chanted and carried signs, most of them hand-made. And their message was clear – anyone other than President-Elect Donald Trump. Ann Morris of Columbus was one of them.

Text of Gov Kasich’s veto on Heartbeat bill
Andy Chow

Gov. John Kasich has signed one abortion ban, but vetoed another one. 

Kasich used his line-item veto power and struck down the so-called “Heartbeat Bill”, which would ban abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat could be detected. But he left the child abuse bill that ban was attached to intact.

If the Heartbeat Bill had become law, it would be the strictest abortion ban in the country, and many critics said it was unconstitutional. But Kasich signed another ban that would outlaw abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Jo Ingles

A bill that would ban abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat can be detected was passed late last night in the Ohio House. That vote came a few hours after it was suddenly approved in the Senate. And it got through the legislature in an unexpected way.

After years of trying to get the so-called Heartbeat Bill passed, and more than a year after it passed the House, Janet Folger Porter of Faith2Action was giddy after the Senate passed it 21 to 10.

Abortion protestors at Ohio Statehouse recently
Jo Ingles / WYSO

A decision by the Ohio Department of Health to order a Dayton area abortion clinic to shut down is drawing criticism and praise. Abortion opponents say it’s a step in the right direction but supporters of legal abortion say it is politically motivated over-reach by a state agency.

NARAL Pro Choice Ohio’s Gabriel Mann condemns the decision by the Ohio Department of Health to revoke an operating license for a Dayton area abortion clinic, “Well, this definitely appears to be a witch hunt.”

Ohio Senate

The GOP gained a seat in the Senate this fall, so there will be 24 Republicans and nine Democrats in the 33 member chamber. And when the new session of the General Assembly starts in January, it will have some new leadership.  

Republican Senator Larry Obhof will lead the Senate next year as term limited President Keith Faber takes a seat in the Ohio House.  Obhof, who has been in the Senate since 2011, will be the first Senator from Medina County to lead the chamber since the 1860s.

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