Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

Dayton Literary Peace Prize/Anne Rasmussen
Dayton Literary Peace Prize/Anne Rasmussen

Finalists have been announced for the 2015 Dayton Literary Peace Prize. The awards are given to authors who have written stories about peace, social justice, or global understanding and have been handed out since the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords ended the Bosnian war. 

Peace Prize founder and co-chair Sharon Rabb says six finalists were chosen in both the fiction and nonfiction categories.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: Community Voices producer Marika Snider talks with two local artists about finding their Third Space. WYSO’s Lewis Wallace looks at Ohio’s economy as it stands this Labor Day weekend.  Also today we’ve got some speacial guests in studio from the Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions. And a compilation of our series Deconstructing Race. See the full program details below.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Planned Parenthood Southwest Ohio (PPSWO) and the Women's Med Group have filed a lawsuit against the Ohio Department of Health (ODH). The lawsuit challenges the constitutionality of abortion restrictions in the two most recent state budgets.

Kenyatta Chandler with Ohio Development Service talks with minority  business owners st the Dayton Job Center.
Jerry Kenney

For the first time ever, the state of Ohio says it has reached its goal of supporting minority-owned businesses. State officials met with minority business owners at the job center in Dayton to tout the achievement and talk about increasing the number of businesses eligible for state contracts.

Surpassing its 15 percent goal, the state says 19 percent of all goods and services purchased this year have been through minority businesses. That equates to more than $228 million dollars spent with those businesses, up from $165 million in 2014.

Montgomery County Commision President Debbie Leiberman (center) and other county and business leaders annouce $2.7 million awarded to the county for workforce development.
Jerry Kenney

Montgomery County has announced $2.7 million in new federal and state funding for workforce development.

The county’s workforce division will use two U.S. Department of Labor grants to fund job training programs in manufacturing, logistics, and transportation.

Dayton History recently celebrated its 10-year anniversary as Dayton’s premiere historic preservation organization.  In that time, the group says visits to Dayton History sites like Carillon Park, the Paul Lawrence Dunbar House, and other sites have increased by 185 percent.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend, the home of YSO produced news and features: Dayton History is now celebrating 10 years of historic preservation at Carillon Park.  We’ll talk with President and CEO Brady Kress about some major accomplishments in the last decade, and what’s next for the organization.  We’ll also hear about a new arts program kicking off at the Dayton Metro Library. See details below.

The life of a local sports legend will play out in a short documentary film premiering tonight in Dayton.

In the 1970’s, Dwight Anderson was nicknamed "The Blur" because of his speed on the basketball court. As a sophomore, he led Roth High School to a state championship title in 1975 and as a senior in 1978 was named top high school player in the country.

Anderson went to play for the universities of Kentucky and Southern California and was a second round NBA draft pick for the Washington Bullets in 1982.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend, the home of YSO produced news and features: The Dwight Anderson Story comes to the Kroc Center in Dayton this week. Anderson was considered a high school basketball phenomenon at Roth in the 1970’s. He went on to the NBA and then almost lost it all.  We’ll find out how technology is helping students with disabilities, and the new challenges it brings them. And where does your recycling go?  We’ll answer that question and more in our program.

Dayton Right to Life will take part in a National Day of Protest Against Planned Parenthood on Saturday. The effort is being lead by a coalition of national pro-life groups. The local organization will hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood health center on N. Wilkinson St. downtown.