Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

Shaad Ahmed
Jerry Kenney

Earlier this month three Muslim-American students were found dead in their home in Chapel Hill, North Carolina—and a local Dayton resident says he knew them well.

Deah Barakat, 23; his wife, Yusor Abu-Salha, 21; and her sister, Razan Abu-Salha, 19 were shot and killed over a reported parking dispute. Their neighbor, 46 year old Craig Hicks, turned himself in several hours after the crime. He was indicted by a grand jury last week.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: Dayton Youth Radio and more from our Veteran’s Voices series. We’ll here from a visiting professor at Antioch College who will talk about recent waves of children crossing the US border from Central America. And you'll hear from a Dayton man who shared a close bond with three Muslim American college students shot and killed in Chapel Hill, North Caroline earlier this month.  See full program details below.

Tuskegee Airmen
Jerry Kenney/WYSO / NMUSAF

This month, the National Museum of the United States Air Force is featuring an exhibit dedicated to the Tuskegee Airmen—an all African-American army air corps squadron who served in the WWII.  The museum has expanded the exhibit, and to find out more about the Airmen and their historical significance, we spoke with museum historian Dr. Jeff Underwood. In the following interview, Underwood calls the inception of the Tuskegee Airmen into WWII a 'watershed moment' in American military and civil rights history.

Our features include Miami Valley StoryCorps and Dayton Youth Radio. Community Voices producer Pam Ferris-Olson looks back on the life of Daytonian and Gospelaires lead singer, Paul Arnold. And we’ll hear about an expanded exhibit at the Air Force Museum featuring the Tuskegee Airmen and their role in the Second World War. 

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: WYSO Archives Fellow Jocelyn Robinson offers up rare recordings of former Antioch College President, Authur Morgan.  You’ll also hear a first hand account of the 1942 raid on Tokyo, Japan, from Doolittle Raider Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor who died on Wednesday. Also in the program, Miami Valley StoryCorps - today, a mother and Daughter share memories of a father and grandfather, and of Iran. Story details below.

Lt. Col. Edward Saylor Talks to press in 2013, hours before the four remaining Doolittle Raiders raise their final toast.
Jerry Kenney/WYSO

In 2013, the last four survivors the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders gathered at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.  They raised a final toast in honor of their accomplishment and to the men who died before them.

On Wednesday, Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor, one of the final four, died in his home state of Washington. Saylor was the flight engineer of Crew #15 on the famous Doolittle Tokyo Raid. A mission that was said to change the course of World War II.

Jerry Kenney/WYSO

The Dayton Development Coalition and the Ohio Federal-Military Jobs Commission (OFMJC) held a forum at Wright State University’s Nutter Center on Thursday to discuss federal job retention and expansion in the state.  

Governor Kasich signed the commission into law in 2014 to make Ohio more competitive in job growth by leveraging the state’s military assets like Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

Children's Hospital of Dayton

Health coverage for 130,000 Ohio children through the Children’s Health Insurance Program or CHIP is set to expire later this year. 

Ohio's Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown was at Dayton Children’s Hospital on Monday to announce his plans for extending the CHIP program set to expire in September. Brown says he’ll be the lead sponsor of legislation to address the issue.

Dayton Community Blood/Tissue Services

The Dayton Community Blood Center says it supports removing a lifetime ban on gay men donating blood. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is considering the change.

Dayton CBC and blood centers across the country have been calling for a removal of the lifetime ban for years, says CEO Dr. David Smith.

“At the time that was established their were reasons for it—because we did not have good blood testing systems or blood tests to be able to detect those things that you're concerned about, at the time it was HIV,” he said.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: We’ll here about proposed changes by the US Food and Drug Administration to end the life-time ban on gay men donating blood. And later in the program our Veterans Voices series continues as we learn about Army veteran 93 year old Jim Martin who parachuted into Normandy this year to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion. Jeremy Dobbins has that story. We’ll begin with a conversation with a Waynesville mom who’s son was brutally murdered almost a year ago, and find out how she’s coping. See full program details below.

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