WYSO

Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition.

In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies.

Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as a first place, national award from Public Radio News Directors Inc. (PRINDI) for his work. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

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Longtime Dayton public servant Willis E. Blackshear has died. He served in the Montgomery County treasurer’s office for 22 years, and as county recorder since 2008.

 

The 57-year-old Dayton native and graduate of Paul Laurence Dunbar High School died in hospice care on Monday. He was diagnosed with cancer nine months ago, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley told WYSO.

 

She says Blackshear really understood the value of public service.

Dayton History

On Saturday, February 24th at Memorial Hall, Dayton History once again hosts its annual Fight Night fundraiser. Dayton locals will battle it out in the boxing ring and audience goers are encouraged to dress for the occasion in 1920's and 30's garb.

To get the details on this year’s event WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Jeff Brown, founder of the Brown Institute of Martial Arts in Centerville. He’s been training the athletes for their fights. And, joining us in the conversation this year, Savannah Winfield with Dayton History.

Entrepreneur Magazine reports that revenue from food trucks has nearly tripled, from $960 million to $2.7 billion, nationally over the last five years. And here in the Miami Valley, food trucks have become commonplace. Jayne Monat of Yellow Springs asked WYSO about the impact of Dayton area food trucks on the local economy in comparison with brick and mortar restaurants For this installment of WYSO Curious, we sent Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds out to eat.

City of Dayton Youtube Channel

Dayton mayor Nan Whaley delivered her annual State of the City address on Wednesday. For just over twenty minutes, the mayor touched on issues including the city’s opioid crisis, education, and the announcement of the closing of Good Samaritan Hospital, which Whaley said was one of her toughest days in office.

 

Miami Valley Fair Housing investigated more than 70 Fannie Mae properties from 2010, 2012, and 2014.
MVFHC / MVFHC

An organization that works to prevent housing discrimination in Montgomery County is facing drastic organizational changes. This is after the Miami Valley Fair Housing Center lost federal funding that comprised a significant portion of its budget.

 

Miami Valley Fair Housing Center President and CEO Jim McCarthy says the loss of funding is a major blow to the organization. He says they were denied more than $400,000 in grants this year because of its ties to the Central Ohio Fair Housing Association in Columbus.

Across the country, many school districts are grappling with declining enrollment. Many of these districts are opting to shutter schools in an effort to save money and consolidate resources. This is despite conflicting research on the benefits of school closures. Now, Dayton may be next.  In December, DPS leaders revealed many district schools are operating at under 50-percent capacity. Officials launched a task force to help decide the fate of Dayton’s emptiest school buildings –– many of them on the West Side.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton officials are asking the Air Force to stop what they say is groundwater contaminated by Wright-Patterson Air Force Base from flowing into Huffman Dam. Officials say samples from the city’s early warning monitoring wells network alerted the city to chemical contaminants in the water.

 

Officials are emphasizing they have not found any of the contaminants in water provided to residents. They say Dayton's drinking water remains safe for consumption.

When you enter the small lobby of the Country Kitchen on Interstate 71 in Lebanon, Ohio, the first thing you're likely to notice is a set of side-by-side bulletin boards nearly covered with business cards, flyers and brochures.

 

In the age of online advertising, it looks like more than a few people still choose this old-school method of promoting the items and services they have to offer.

 

Dayton Power & Light DP&L
DP&L (Linkedin)

Dayton Power and Light and parent company AES Corporation have announced more than 150 employees will be cut in Indiana and Ohio. The cuts, which are part of a restructuring plan announced Tuesday, are expected to take place over the next few weeks.

As part of the restructuring, officials say at least 100 workers from Indianapolis Power and Light will be cut. Another 60 employees in Ohio will lose their jobs, though it’s unclear exactly how many employees will be from the Dayton-area.

 

Salvation Army

The Springfield Salvation Army is looking for dodgeball teams to help raise money for at-risk youth.

 

The ninth annual fundraising tournament will be held in March.

 

Ryan Ray is development director for the Salvation Army.  He says the tournament's mission is to reassure neighborhood young people of their worth.

 

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