Elise Hu

Elise Hu is a reporter who covers the intersection of technology and culture for NPR's on-air, online and multimedia platforms. Beginning in 2015, she will be assigned to the network's new bureau in Seoul, South Korea.

She joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters who helped launch The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu is an adjunct instructor at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

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All Tech Considered
12:57 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

How Hong Kong Protesters Are Connecting, Without Cell Or Wi-Fi Networks

People check their phones at a pro-democracy demonstration in Hong Kong on Monday.
Alex Ogle AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 4:59 pm

As throngs of pro-democracy protesters continue to organize in Hong Kong's central business district, many of them are messaging one another through a network that doesn't require cell towers or Wi-Fi nodes. They're using an app called FireChat that launched in March and is underpinned by mesh networking, which lets phones unite to form a temporary Internet.

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All Tech Considered
7:58 am
Sat September 27, 2014

Tech Week That Was: Apple's Gaffes, Shellshock And Hello Ello

Apple CEO Tim Cook walks off stage after speaking during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in June.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

It's time for your weekly look back at the tech headlines from NPR and beyond. Let's get to it ...

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All Tech Considered
7:30 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Shellshock Bug's Impact Could Be Huge, But It's Unclear For Now

Mac OS and Linux operating systems are most at risk for the Shellshock bug.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun September 28, 2014 3:21 pm

Hundreds of millions of computers and networks are at risk after a bug called Shellshock was found this week. It turns out it's actually been around for a while — it took 22 years to discover this bug. If exploited by hackers, the impact could be huge.

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All Tech Considered
5:12 am
Sat September 20, 2014

Tech Week: Smartphone Privacy, Cyberstalking, Alibaba's Big Debut

Founder and Executive Chairman of Alibaba Group Jack Ma celebrates as the Alibaba stock goes live on Friday.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

It was a big Friday for Alibaba, which opened trading on the New York Stock Exchange at the wildly high $92.70 per share. But that wasn't the only tech news this week, so let's get to our roundup.

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All Tech Considered
12:28 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Apple: iOS 8 Prevents Cooperation With Police Unlocking Requests

Apple, which unveiled iOS 8 at June's Worldwide Developers Conference, says it will be technologically unfeasible for police to extract data from its new operating system.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 5:16 pm

Apple's latest mobile operating system — iOS 8 — is now available, and with it, a new technical hurdle for law enforcement. The company says it will be technologically impossible to access data on phones and iPads running iOS 8, because it won't allow user pass codes to be bypassed.

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