Dave Barber

Host, Jazz Night

Dave Barber has hosted programs on WYSO dating back to 1977. A Dayton native, Barber got involved with the station after listening to YSO and learning about all kinds of music from programmers such as Art Snyder, Larry Blood, Jon Fox and many others. His program Jazz Night features a wide range of music from across the continuum of jazz including swing era giants such as Duke Ellington and Count Basie, modern icons Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk and Charles Mingus and today's premier improvisers.

Ways to Connect

By Chip.berlet (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

In 1962 an Ohio State student, a singer and guitarist named Phil Ochs, moved to New York City and was soon at the center of the booming folk music scene in Greenwich Village which included Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Peter Paul and Mary. Today Phil Ochs' music is less well known than some of his colleagues'—but it still delivers a powerful message.

Dayton librarian Matt Kish illustrated all 552 pages of Moby-Dick
courtesy of Tin House Books

The novel Moby-Dick by Herman Melville is a dense and complicated   beast of a book by any measure. Even serious readers never finish it.  Melville published it in 1851 and since then it’s been adapted and re-imagined by artists over and over.

Schedule of events for the April 1965 Vietnam Colloquium at Antioch College
courtesy of Antiochiana

In 1965, as increasing numbers of American troops were sent to Vietnam, and an American bombing campaign grew, public forums were organized on college campuses across the country. They were known as “teach-ins”   The idea was to study the war and the draft in depth.  In April of 1965, the Vietnam Colloquium, was held over three days on the Yellow Springs campus of Antioch College.

Dave Barber / WYSO

The kind of storytelling once only found in movie theatres is everywhere now —streamable at Amazon and Netflix, available at ITunes, and on television, too. Community Voices producer Dave Barber wondered how all this content is affecting the two art house cinemas in the region:The Little Art Theatre in Yellow Springs and the Neon in Dayton.

An Art House cinema is an independently run theatre that shows movies you don’t see everywhere - foreign films, documentaries, smaller films - often not produced by the big studios.


Courtesy of Diana Tomas

Rediscovered Radio returns to the Viet Nam war period – when a Yellow Springs resident, inspired by his Quaker beliefs, took part in a dramatic war protest. The Quaker community he was a part of continues a tradition of active pacifism.

Forty nine years ago this spring, the war in Viet Nam was escalating. Nearly half a million American troops were in South Viet Nam at the time, supporting the government in its war with the North.

John VanderHaagen / Flickr Creative Commons

Baseball's All Star Game comes to Cincinnati on Tuesday, and controversial Reds legend Pete Rose is scheduled to be on the field.  This spring, Rose applied to the commissioner of Major League Baseball for re-instatement, 26 years after he was banned from baseball for gambling. Community Voices producer Dave Barber explores baseball's complicated relationship with the man known as The Hit King.

 In 1962, with funds provided by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), Charlie Cobb boarded a bus in Washington D.C and headed to Houston, Texas to attend a civil rights workshop. At a stopover in Jackson, Mississippi, he contacted the local Student Non Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) group. Activist Lawrence Guyot persuaded him to stay and contribute to the organizing efforts already underway. Five years on the ground in Mississippi between 1962 and 1967 gave Cobb a perspective few historians have.

50 years ago this month, volunteers from across the country came to Oxford, Ohio to prepare for a pivotal event in the civil rights movement. Dave Barber created this story for WYSO'S Community Voices. 

“We hope to send into Mississippi this summer upwards of 1000 teachers, ministers and students from all around the country who will engage in what are we calling freedom schools, community center programs, voter registration activities, in general a program designed to open Mississippi to the country.”    Bob Moses  1964