Bill Cohen (Ohio Public Radio)

Bill Cohen is now in his 40th year of news reporting for Ohio's public radio and TV stations. Over the years, he's covered hundreds of different public policy issues ...from tax hikes, budget crunches, and soaring college tuition to capitol punishment, abortion, and gay marriage. Among the most high-profile developments he's covered: the 1993 Lucasville prison riot, the long-running legal battle over school funding, dozens of elections for governor and president, and the rise and fall of political legends such as Governor James Rhodes and House Speaker Vern Riffe.

When Ohio news merits national attention, you can hear Bill's radio reports on National Public Radio programs like "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition," and on another national radio show, "Marketplace."

In addition to interviewing newsmakers on the weekly public TV show, "The State of Ohio," Bill is also an occasional guest on "Columbus on the Record" on WOSU-TV and on "Capitol Square" on the Ohio News Network. Bill's freelance reporting also appears on Stateline.org, a website that reports on state government action across the nation. Bill's reports have won numerous first place awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters and the Cleveland Press Club. In 2006, the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors gave him all four of its first place awards for his reporting on state government. In 2004, Bill was honored with the Carl Day Outstanding Achievement Award from the Ohio Associated Press.

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Poverty
4:40 pm
Wed November 16, 2011

Advocates Predict Ohio Homelessness Will Worsen

Advocates trying to solve Ohio's problem of homelessness predict it will get worse in the coming months. Bill Faith heads the Coalition on Housing and Homelessness in Ohio. He says federal money to help the homeless is running out.

"Ohio got its share of money, almost 66 million dollars, that since 2010 has been used to prevent homelessness for thousands of Ohioans who were on the edge, but that money is beginning to dry up," says Faith.

Election 2011
6:11 am
Wed November 9, 2011

New Collective Bargaining Law Repealed by Voters

By a vote of 61% to 39 voters said kill the law. It would have given management the final say in long running impasses, used job performance to determine pay and lay offs, and out law strikes.

“People have stood up and said do not treat our public employees this way. we respect our firefighters, we respect our police officers, our teachers, our nurses, our bus drivers, the people that work at our schools, the people that plow our streets and they know what’s best for their cities. Give them a voice at the table,” says Cincinnati firefighter Dirk Sterns.

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Politics
4:03 am
Wed November 9, 2011

Ohio Voters Repeal Collective Bargaining Law

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 8:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Good morning. We're at the point of the election cycle sometimes called the off-off year. Not many offices were up for grabs but yesterday, some high-profile measures were on state ballots.

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Politics
5:44 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Collective Bargaining Wrap Up: Part 2

Ohio’s new law that slashes the power of public employee unions has sparked one of the most bitter debates in modern Ohio history. Voters now have the chance to endorse it or kill it when they vote on state issue 2. Yesterday, statehouse correspondent Bill Cohen recalled for us how this measure got onto the ballot. Today, in part 2 of his wrap-up series, we hear pro and con arguments on some of the new law’s many provisions.

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Politics
5:44 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

Collective Bargaining Wrap Up: Part 1

Some call it a common sense law to control government labor costs and help over-burdened taxpayers. Others call it an attack on public employees, unions, and the whole middle class. Both sides are talking about the same thing: State Issue 2. It’s on the ballot so voters can either endorse or kill the new collective bargaining law that Republicans pushed through the legislature. Part one of a two part series from Ohio Public Radio's Bill Cohen.

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