WYSO

Associated Press

Office of Governor John Kasich

Ohio Gov. John Kasich says President Donald Trump's move last week to cut subsidies to health insurers will ultimately hurt people who won't be able to afford coverage.

Kasich appeared Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press." Ohio is one of the states that expanded Medicaid coverage under President Barack Obama's 2010 Affordable Care Act, leading to more than 700,000 Ohioans obtaining health insurance.

Subsidies to insurers help reduce the cost some people pay for health care.

gun
Ken "kcdsTM" / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio gun groups say they oppose any bans on a gun accessory called bump stocks used by the Las Vegas mass shooter to turn semi-automatic rifles into rapid-fire automatic weapons.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the Buckeye Firearms Association and Ohioans for Concealed Carry say a ban would be a threat to American gun rights.

Stephen Paddock equipped rifles with bump stocks that he used to kill 58 people and wound hundreds from a Las Vegas hotel room a week ago.

Veteran's Health / Flickr Creative Commons

Officials at the Dayton VA Medical Center are launching a new effort to prevent veteran suicides.

 VA officials signed a pledge Thursday committing to a plan to help reduce suicides. Officials will organize a "buddy system" to identify at-risk veterans using predictive modeling while expanding suicide prevention training. The new initiative also includes partnerships with community organizations.

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

Air Force marathon officials say they are considering making changes to their races after attendance dropped by nearly 2,000 runners.

Marathon director Rob Aguiar tells the Dayton Daily News race officials are exploring adding a shorter race and enabling runners to do more than one event.

Race figures show the 5K and 10k races both sold out this month, but the half- and full-marathons came up short of previous years.

Flickr Creative Common User Claudio Toledo

Amazon has made it official: It plans to locate one of its fulfillment centers in the southwest Ohio city of Monroe, bringing more than 1,000 jobs.

Ohio recently approved a 1.39 percent, 10-year tax credit for the project, along with a tax credit for a planned fulfillment center near Cleveland that could employ 2,000 people.

The Seattle-based e-commerce giant says the Monroe center will add to more than 6,000 Amazon employees already in Ohio.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley talked to supporters and colleagues after her second state of the city speech Wednesday.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Democratic candidates for Ohio governor are holding the first in a series of statewide debates aimed at raising the party's visibility and appeal as it tries to take back the seat from Republicans next year.

 Contenders set to square off in a town hall style forum at Martins Ferry High School Tuesday are former U.S. Rep. Betty Sutton, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, former state Rep. Connie Pillich and state Sen. Joe Schiavoni.

Flickr Creative Commons User Tengrrl

A dispute over whether to shut down Toledo's last abortion clinic is headed to the Ohio Supreme Court in a case both sides view as pivotal.

At issue in Tuesday's oral arguments is the Ohio Department of Health's 2014 order shutting down Capital Care of Toledo for lack of a patient-transfer agreement with a local hospital.

Such agreements were mandated, and public hospitals barred from providing them, under restrictions Ohio lawmakers passed in 2013. The change prompted the public University of Toledo Hospital to withdraw from its transfer arrangement with Capital Care.

A Cleveland police vehicle. An officer is accused in the shooting death of two unarmed people in 2012.
Raymond Wambsgans / Flickr/Creative Commons

A small Ohio news organization says one of its employees has been shot by a sheriff's deputy who they say apparently mistook his camera for a weapon.

The New Carlisle News reports photographer Andy Grimm had left the office Monday night to take pictures of lightning when he saw a Clark County sheriff's deputy performing a traffic stop in New Carlisle, north of Dayton.

Grimm tells the news organization that he decided to take pictures of the traffic stop. He says he got out of his Jeep and started setting up his tripod and camera when he was shot in the side.

The Dutch manufacturer of a thrill ride that broke apart and killed an 18-year-old man at the Ohio State Fair says excessive corrosion on a support beam led to a "catastrophic failure."

KMG posted the memo dated Friday on its Facebook page Sunday that says company officials visited the accident site and conducted metallurgical tests.

The statement says the corrosion "dangerously reduced" the thickness on the wall of the beam holding a passenger gondola on the swinging and spinning ride. The company says the ride was 18 years old.

Officials say rides shut down at the Ohio State Fair after a fatal ride accident are open after being re-inspected.

Fair officials made the announcement Sunday morning. Some rides, mostly in the fair's Kiddie Land, had previously reopened.

All rides were shut down last Wednesday night after a swinging and spinning ride called the Fire Ball broke apart, killing 18-year-old high school student Tyler Jarrell and injuring seven others, several critically.

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