WYSO

Associated Press

Dan Konik / Statehouse News Bureau

Former consumer watchdog Richard Cordray says he will focus his campaign for governor on improving the lives of Ohio's families.

At a hometown diner crowded with press and supporters, the 58-year-old Cordray said Tuesday that he will focus on "kitchen table issues" like the costs of health care and college.

User Jaypt77 / Flickr Creative Commons

The U.S. Navy's famed Blue Angels are set to soar over Dayton for the first time in four years.

 The Dayton Air Show, scheduled for next June, has been without a headline military jet team the past two years after crashes prevented both the Blue Angels and the Air Force Thunderbirds from performing in southwest Ohio.

The Dayton Daily News reports the Thunderbirds canceled appearances in June after a jet slid off a runway at Dayton International Airport and crashed, injuring the pilot.

ODOT

State officials say a new billboard campaign will be used to raise public awareness about drug abuse and the need for public participation in tackling the problem throughout Ohio.

The Ohio Outdoor Advertising Association of Ohio and Ohio's Department of Public Safety and Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services launched the campaign Tuesday.

Officials say association members are donating about 200 digital, poster, and bulletin billboards with the messages: "Start Talking!" and "#677 for Impaired Drivers."

Dayton Springfield Cincinnati highway traffic interstate skyline roadways transportation car automobiles vehicles
Ohio Department of Transportation Facebook page

The Ohio State Highway Patrol is warning motorists heading into the Thanksgiving holiday period to follow all traffic laws, including buckling seat belts and never driving impaired.

The patrol says nine people were killed in nine crashes on Ohio roads during the long holiday weekend last year. Five of those fatalities resulted from impaired drivers and six did not use seat belts.

Troopers say they will have an increased presence on Ohio's roadways in an effort to remove impaired drivers.

Ohio statehouse
thoth188 / Flickr Creative Commons

The Ohio Senate has passed legislation that would make it a crime for a doctor to perform an abortion if the fetus might have Down syndrome.

The Dispatch reports the Senate on Wednesday passed the legislation by a 20-12 vote. It makes performing such abortions a fourth-degree felony and requires the state medical board to revoke a physician's license if convicted.

The Ohio House approved an identical measure earlier this month.

Wes Goodman / Twitter

The second Ohio state lawmaker in a month has resigned amid allegations of inappropriate behavior.

 State Rep. Wes Goodman, a Cardington Republican, resigned on Wednesday.

Republican House Speaker Clifford Rosenberger says he learned of Goodman's inappropriate behavior Tuesday and confronted him immediately.

No details have been made public about what Goodman's inappropriate behavior entails.

Goodman says in a statement he regrets "actions and choices" that prevent him from carrying out his duties "in a way that reflects the best ideals of public service."

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Wright State University's administration says a strike is not imminent even though the faculty union has set up the process that would allow them to strike if a contract isn't reached.

 The Wright State chapter of the American Association of University Professors union recently passed an amendment to its constitution to allow a strike. A union leader says the faculty had never needed a strike procedure. Negotiations have been stalled since March.

Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Ohio voters rejected a proposal Tuesday that sought to curb prescription drug prices paid by the state for prisoners, injured workers and poor people while supporting a crime victims' rights amendment with no organized opposition.

The pharmaceutical industry spent more than $50 million to oppose Issue 2, the Ohio Drug Price Relief Act, saying it would reduce access to medicines and raise prices for veterans and others.

Office of Governor John Kasich

Ohio Gov. John Kasich says President Donald Trump's move last week to cut subsidies to health insurers will ultimately hurt people who won't be able to afford coverage.

Kasich appeared Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press." Ohio is one of the states that expanded Medicaid coverage under President Barack Obama's 2010 Affordable Care Act, leading to more than 700,000 Ohioans obtaining health insurance.

Subsidies to insurers help reduce the cost some people pay for health care.

gun
Ken "kcdsTM" / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio gun groups say they oppose any bans on a gun accessory called bump stocks used by the Las Vegas mass shooter to turn semi-automatic rifles into rapid-fire automatic weapons.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the Buckeye Firearms Association and Ohioans for Concealed Carry say a ban would be a threat to American gun rights.

Stephen Paddock equipped rifles with bump stocks that he used to kill 58 people and wound hundreds from a Las Vegas hotel room a week ago.

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