WYSO

Associated Press

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Officials in Dayton plan to resume using cameras to catch drivers who run red lights, two years after dropping that practice to comply with Ohio restrictions and a legal battle.

The Dayton City Commission approved the program's restart in a 5-0 vote Wednesday.

City officials say speed detectors and red-light cameras will make the city safer. Police officials have said traffic crashes increased, and the number of traffic deaths doubled after the original red light cameras were removed.

Ken "kcdsTM" / Flickr

Trustees at a small university in Ohio have approved allowing faculty and staff with permits to carry concealed weapons on campus.

Cedarville University will become the first college in Ohio to allow concealed weapons on campus.

The Dayton Daily News reports reports the new policy announced will take effect in August.

A new Ohio law allows individual boards of trustees to decide whether to allow concealed weapons on campus.

Federal prosecutors are accusing a Jordanian citizen living in Ohio of attempting to travel to Syria and fight with the Islamic State group against the Syrian leadership.

The U.S. Justice Department says 26-year-old Laith Waleed Alebbini was arrested Wednesday at the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport in Hebron, Kentucky.

Alebbini is due in court Thursday afternoon in Dayton, Ohio, where he had been living. Court documents do not indicate whether he has an attorney.

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

A new designation will honor Ohio schools that demonstrate commitment to helping students and families connected to the military.

 State officials announced the Purple Star Award for military-friendly schools during an event Tuesday at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, near Dayton.

Tressa Sherrod via Facebook

An Ohio city has spent over $430,000 defending two officers in connection with the fatal police shooting of a man at a Wal-Mart who was carrying an air rifle from a store shelf.

The Dayton Daily News reports the cost to the Dayton suburb of Beavercreek includes about $210,000 paid to two law firms.

The city's law director says outside counsel was necessary. Crawford family attorney Michael Wright says the money could have gone toward a settlement for the family.

Duke Energy

Two key hearings have been set to discuss if a proposed natural gas pipeline can be built under Cincinnati's suburbs.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports a public hearing June 15 at the University of Cincinnati-Blue Ash campus will allow citizens to express thoughts on the proposed 13-mile long pipeline planned to run under multiple suburbs in northern Cincinnati.

A number of community organizations have already announced that they will oppose the pipeline project.

An adjudicatory hearing is set July 12 in Columbus.

Montgomery County has sold its fairgrounds to the University of Dayton and a Premier Health Network.

The university and Premier Health both signed a letter of intent in December to buy the Montgomery County Fairgrounds near Dayton.

The university and Premier will each pay $5.25 million of the purchase price.

Montgomery County is giving the institutions $2 million to restore and reuse a historic roundhouse on the property, and the Dayton-Montgomery County Port Authority is contributing a $2.5 million state grant to revitalization efforts.

World Police Vehicles / Flickr Creative Commons

Two brothers accused in a Yellow Springs area double fatal shooting have each been indicted on aggravated murder and murder charges.

Twenty-six-year-old Dustin Merrick and 24-year-old Bret Merrick also are charged with aggravated burglary and felonious assault, among other counts, in the indictments filed yesterday in Greene County Common Pleas Court in Xenia. Dustin Merrick also has been indicted on a count of obstructing justice.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The U.S. attorney general's latest warning that so-called sanctuary cities could lose federal funding has raised more questions about whether Cincinnati might be in jeopardy of losing grants after adopting that legally ambiguous label.

Some sanctuary cities block cooperation between city police and federal immigration authorities.

Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

Republican U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci has entered the 2018 Ohio governor's race against a potential trio of GOP state officeholders.  The 58-year-old Renacci, of Wadsworth in northeast Ohio, sought to position himself Monday as a political outsider alongside three Republicans who have spent their careers in public office: the state attorney general, the secretary of state and the lieutenant governor.

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