Associated Press

KAI / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio University says its expansion into Greene County won't compete with other area universities.

The school's associate dean for industry partnerships says the university in southeastern Ohio plans to begin teaching professional development courses at a research center in Beavercreek. The Dayton Daily News reports the school is also planning to offer graduate school classes at a later point.

Associate Dean Scott Miller says the goal is to fulfill the educational needs for the area. There currently are no plans to offer undergraduate courses in the area.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

Cincinnati's city government is in turmoil after the mayor reportedly sought the city manager's resignation.

Officials were returning Monday to City Hall after news reports Friday that Mayor John Cranley met with City Manager Harry Black and asked him to resign. Black declined to comment during a public event Saturday.

Gov. John Kasich on Thursday advocated a "red flag" law for Ohio, a ban on armor-piercing ammunition and other gun policy positions he says represent political consensus in a bellwether state that could fly nationally.

Flickr Creative Commons User JCSullivan24

Republican Gov. John Kasich says preparations by local and state officials ahead of heavy rains and expected flooding helped Ohio "dodge a bullet" with no loss of life reported to this point.

Kasich held a briefing Sunday at the state's emergency operations center.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine
Statehouse News Bureau

The Ohio attorney general's office says investigations of human trafficking cases rose last year to its highest level since the state began keeping track of those numbers.

 The Blade reports authorities investigated 202 human trafficking cases in 2017, a 50 percent increase from the previous year. The report released last week by the state attorney general's Human Trafficking Commission shows the majority of cases involved the sex trade.

Staub Manufactuting Solutions / Facebook

President Donald Trump's guests for his State of the Union speech Tuesday include Miami Valley welders who have benefited from his tax overhaul.

White House spokesperson Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Staub Manufacturing Solutions owners Steve Staub of Tipp City and Sandy Keplinger of Springfield will attend the speech. Their employee Corey Adams, of Huber Heights, will also be present.

The company has been able to hire more employees due to the GOP tax reform plan passed late last year, according to a White House statement.

Cleveland Indians (Twitter)

The Cleveland Indians announced Monday they are dropping the Chief Wahoo logo from their uniforms next year, bowing to decades of complaints that the grinning, red-faced caricature used in one version or another since 1947 is racist.

The move came after protracted discussions between team owner Paul Dolan and baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred.

The cartoonish image of a big-toothed American Indian with a scarlet face and a single feather in his headdress will come off the team's jersey sleeves and caps starting with the 2019 season.

ECOT Ohio
ecotohio.org

An Ohio county court will oversee the process of closing one of the nation's largest online charter schools amid the e-school's legal fight with the state over funding.

A Franklin County judge has appointed an outside attorney to handle records and finances of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow and report back to the court.

 

Officials say Ohio is joining a national research project to reduce turnover among caseworkers in the child welfare field.

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services says turnover at child welfare agencies is typically six times the average rate for all industries.

Eight Ohio counties will participate in the project led by the Quality Improvement Center for Workforce Development. The organization is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

An Ohio man who admitted he plotted to kill U.S. military members after receiving training in Syria apologized to his family and adopted country Monday before a federal judge sentenced him to 22 years in prison.

After returning to the U.S., Abdirahman Sheik Mohamud planned to fly to Texas and attack the Federal Medical Center Carswell in Fort Worth in an attempt to free Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani scientist convicted of shooting at two U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan, Judge Michael Watson said as he outlined the allegations against Mohamud.

Pages