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University of Dayton police officers are working to make itself more visible around campus.

The department announced several measures to increase its visible presence around campus.

That includes officers working their beats with red and blue lights on top of their cruisers continually lit. They won't flash unless they're responding to a call.

Chief Rodney Chatman says the illuminated lights alert students and would-be criminals that officers are nearby. He says he wants students to be able to see the lights.

Lori Gravley reads Audrey Hackett's poem, "More Questions Than Questions."

Thanks for checking out WYSO Weekend online! Here's what's in today's program.

The Montgomery County Family Treatment Court, was recently awarded a three year grant that will be used to improve the safety and well-being of children caught up in the opioid epidemic.

 

To get the details on how the grant will help, WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Juvenile Court Judge Tony Capizzi, who oversees the program.

 

 

Additional information from Montgomery County:

The Dayton Art Institute is celebrating 45 years of art, cheers and beers at its annual Oktoberfest which is Saturday & Sunday. Great art to see and buy, great food, and great entertainment….including our accordion band on Saturday afternoon.

April Laissle

Wright State University students gathered today to protest recent financial decisions at the school.

Students and faculty members stood near the quad at the University holding signs that spelled out the word “accountability.” It’s a term that was central to their protest today, according to Wright State student Carly Perkins.

“There have been so many budget issues that have happened here on our campus," said Perkins. "And we just want someone to come forward and be honest about that. We just want them to know that we’re watching.”

classroom
Patrick Q / Flickr Creative Commons

A report commissioned by three groups representing officials from traditional public schools shows what they call a strong link between student performance and household income - in other words, kids in wealthy districts do better on tests on average than kids in poor districts do.
 

Using Citizen Science To Learn About Dragonflies

Sep 22, 2016
Bob Globhotzer,  Emeritus Curator Natural History, Ohio History Connection at Big Darby Creek in the Darby Metro Park outside of Columbus.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Dragonflies might be the least understood insects on the planet. They have been called the Devil’s Darning Needles, Mule Killers, and Snake Doctors. For an insect that has been around since before the dinosaurs roamed the earth, surprisingly little is actually known about them. Community Voices producer Renee Wilde went in search of answers to why a dragonflies form a huge swarm on her farm in Ohio every year.

The latest polls show incumbent Senator Rob Portman has a double digit lead over former Governor Ted Strickland in the U.S. Senate race.

For PoliticsOhio, WYSO’s April Laissle talked with Statehouse Correspondent Jo Ingles about how political ads are affecting the race.

PoliticsOhio is a wrap-up of the week's important political news in the state. Each Friday during All Things Considered, the WYSO news department talks with political reporters and experts from across Ohio about local and statewide news.

Balancing Poetry, Scholarship and Parenting

Sep 21, 2016
Lori Gravley / WYSO

Chris DeWeese is a Creative Writing professor at Wright State University, and Heather Christle is a poet who has taught at several area universities. Two and a half years ago their daughter Harriet was born. Poet and Community Voices producer Lori Gravley spoke with Heather and Chris at their Yellow Springs’ home about how they overcome the challenges of raising a child while doing deeply introspective work.

Chris and Heather are parents, poets, and professors, trying to balance it all

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