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WYSO Weekend is the home of WYSO produced news and special features. Today we’ve got WYSO Curious with Lewis Wallace and climate commentary from Bob Brecha. And we've got plenty of reaction to the Supreme Court's ruling on gay marriage. 

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

The state budget is now on the governor’s desk, and he says he’ll sign it by the fiscal year’s end on June 30. 

Gov. John Kasich didn’t get a lot of what he wanted – for instance, increases in the sales, commercial activity or fracking taxes. But he says it’s the third budget in a row to cut income taxes.

“We push very, very big ideas here. And sometimes a victory is to push those ideas,” Kasich said. “You get as much of it done as you can.”

Wittenberg is claiming the firm of Martin, Brown, Hull and Harper provided bad legal advice.
Wikipedia

A Springfield law firm wants a misconduct lawsuit dismissed against it that was filed by Wittenberg University earlier this year.

Wittenberg claimed in the lawsuit that the firm of Martin, Brown, Hull and Harper provided bad legal advice that caused the school to suffer severe financial losses. The complaint alleges that two partners in the law firm had several conflicts of interest while representing the university. They're seeking $25,000 in damages.

One of those conflicts was the university's use of endowment funds to purchase the Springfield Museum of Art in 2010.

Office of Governor John Kasich

Gov. John Kasich is ready to run for president – he’s scheduled his campaign kick off for a few weeks from now at his alma mater. 

Kasich was back on Sunday morning TV – this week on CBS’ Face the Nation – and was once again asked about when he might officially join the crowded Republican presidential field. 

“We’re getting awfully close to making a decision,” Kasich said.

Once or twice a week I attend a meeting. It takes place in my recliner, usually late a night. I feel compelled to attend. Let's call this meeting to order. Repressing my guilt I open the next book and smile as I say say to myself again: hello, I'm Vick, and I'm a crime fiction junkie.

Conrad Balliet reads Peter Caccaveri's poem, "Gift."

courtesy of Dayton History

Tonight at 7pm Five faculty members from the Wright State Environmental Sciences program will lead a public hike through Glen Helen Nature Preserve. You will discover the uniqueness of Glen's biosphere and hydrosphere while exploring human impacts on the ecosystem. With the changing climate, "Water, Earth, Biota," was a call to bring public awareness and scientific research to the nature preserve.

Ohio's State, Federal Lawmakers React To Supreme Court Decision

Jun 26, 2015
Thousands of Ohio residents using subsidies to pay for federally-mandated health insurance could lose that funding.
Flickr/Creative Commons

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 Thursday to uphold subsidies under the Affordable Care Act. That means about 160,000 Ohioans will be able to keep getting money to help them pay for their individual health insurance plans on federal exchanges.

For health insurance companies like CareSource, the news was good.

“When folks have been able to afford insurance, they are now seeking care for things they put off for 5, 10, 20 years, and we’re changing lives with the Affordable Care Act,” CareSource Ohio Market President Steve Ringel said.  

But for others it wasn’t that simple.

Ohio Budget Passes Senate, Heads To House For Friday Vote

Jun 25, 2015

State senators on Thursday passed a sweeping $71.2 billion, two-year budget that provides an income tax cut for Ohioans, funds public schools and seeks to change health care policies.
 
The House is planning to vote on the measure Friday. The deadline for Republican Gov. John Kasich to sign the bill into law is Tuesday. Some things to know as the measure moves toward his desk:
 
     EDUCATION:
 

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Affordable Care Act

Jun 25, 2015
Wikipedia

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court has upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

The justices said in a 6-3 ruling Thursday that the subsidies that 8.7 million people currently receive to make insurance affordable do not depend on where they live, under the 2010 health care law. About 160,000 Ohioans will continue getting subsidies to pay for the federally-mandated health insurance. 

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