Arts & Culture

Liz West / Flickr Creative Commons

The speed of summer seemx to be accelerating with the heat of Dog Days. I rest in my yard, holding the day close, binding it together with what lies around me.

In my garden pond, the three-petaled flowers of the arrowhead opened overnight, a few days before they did last year. The yellow coneflowers are a week ahead of schedule.

The zinnias and the Shasta daisies I planted from seed are finally blossoming, bright oranges and reds joining the white phlox and the pinks of the petunias. The lilies are almost done blooming now.

Readers love to try to pigeonhole books and authors. So do reviewers. We seem to need to have some points of reference. Someone will claim that a writer is like Hemingway or Faulkner or heaven forbid, Cormac McCarthy. They want to have definable genres that people can recognize. This novel is crime fiction. That one is chick lit. Or maybe this is grit lit? Chick lit veering into grit lit?

When we look back at the Civil War period of American History we often have a tendency to examine things that we consider to have been clear cut. For example; Ohio was a free state or Kentucky was a slave state. In his book "The Rivers Ran Backward - the Civil War and the Remaking of the Middle American Border" Christopher Phillips makes the case that things were not really like that in the border states between the Union and the Confederacy. Rather than divisions that could be described as black or white, slave or free, there were infinite shades of gray (and blue).

Pokemon GO Primer from Silas Dakota

Jul 18, 2016
Niantic

  This week, Niki Dakota talks with Excursions’ senior Pokemon correspondent, also known as her son, Silas. Together they bring listeners up to speed on the new Pokemon GO smartphone game that’s become a worldwide sensation.

Conrad Balliet reads Ed Davis' poem, "I Told Jesus."

Over the years that I have been hosting this program I have witnessed a lot of changes on the book publishing landscape. Technology has had an impact. Electronic books are now popular. Almost anybody can publish a book now if they want to do so.
 

Book publishing has been going through consolidations. Back in the 1990's there were many more authors who went out on book tours. We used to get several passing through the WYSO studios each week for live interviews. Those days are gone.

Myrna Stone reads her poem, "To My Parents."

Elizabeth Schmidt reads her poem, "Your Purple Scarf."

This weekend marks the first Dayton Mini Maker Faire, an event celebrating makers of all stripes at Carillon Park.  Make It Dayton founding member Josh Cory visited the WYSO studios to talk with Kaleidoscope host Juliet Fromholt about the festivities.  He was joined by The Collaboratory's Peter Benkendorf, who gave listeners an exclusive preview of Putter Up Dayton, which will celebrate its launch at the Maker Faire.

With a new album underway, The Pullouts made a return visit to the WYSO studios for a live set on Excursions.  The band chatted with Niki Dakota about recording, upcoming live gigs and more.

The Pullouts will perform at W.O. Wrights on Saturday, July 16th.

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