Basim Blunt / WYSO

My Natural Journey: A Teen Reflects On Hair And Culture

This week on Dayton Youth Radio we’ll hear from Dayton Early College Academy student Jameka Swain about being black and proud of her culture. Jameka says she demonstrates this everyday through her hairstyle. Jameka Swain is a junior at the Dayton Early College Academy. To learn more about DECA, visit the school's website: Special thanks to Anne Rasmussen, Director Community involvement at DECA. Support for Dayton Youth Radio comes from Dayton Rotary Foundation, the Fred and Alice Wallace...
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Inserting the Solar Impulse into the mobile inflatable hangar.
Dan Patterson

Solar Impulse Makes A Stop In Dayton

Last Saturday night, the future of aviation came to Dayton, where manned flight was created. The Solar Impulse, an electrically powered aircraft, which uses solar cells to generate its power landed at Dayton International Airport on the latest leg of an attempt to circle the earth. Our aviation commentator Dan Patterson was there. The Solar Impulse approaching Dayton International Airport, looking very much a UFO.Credit Dan PattersonEdit | RemoveLike an apparition, the Solar Impulse appeared...
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Community Calendar Spotlight on Piatt Castles

May 26, 2016

Gothic Castles probably aren’t the first thing that pops to mind when you think of Ohio, but we do have them.  Piatt Castles in West Liberty are two examples.
 

Built in the 1860’s by the son’s of Benjamin Piatt, the two brothers created their lavish castle’s just three quarters of a mile from each other in the Logan County Countryside.  Donn named his residence Mac-O-Chee, and Abram called his Mac-A-Cheek.The Piatt families lived in the homes until 1985, and they still own and manage the castles as museums and rental facilities.

Tap water
Joe Cheng / Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Fairborn is recovering from a water line break that left 2,500 people without reliable service. The cracked section of the line, located on Duncan Street, was replaced on Monday. The city issued a boil order for residents in several areas of the city on the same day, causing many local businesses to close.
 

The order was lifted yesterday, after water samples came back negative for any bacteria.

John Glenn, Jr. Signed Photograph to Wallace Greene, Jr., 1962 - From the Wallace M. Greene, Jr. Collection (COLL/3093), Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections
USMC Archives

Astronaut John Glenn is getting an airport named in his honor in his home state of Ohio.

In a gesture of bipartisan cooperation, the Republican-dominated Ohio House voted Wednesday to support a bill adding the 94-year-old Democrat's name to Port Columbus International Airport. The facility's new name will be John Glenn Columbus International Airport.

A Senate vote is also expected Wednesday.

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User: Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

Members of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus want references to slavery removed from the state's constitution.

On Wednesday, the caucus announced a resolution that seeks to address a section of the constitution that says "there shall be no slavery in this State; nor involuntary servitude, unless for the punishment of crime."

State Sen. Charleta Tavares, a Columbus Democrat, says striking that exception for crime would help the state rid itself of "any vestiges of our dark and brutal past."

Central State University

In this WYSO Weekend excerpt, Central State University's Edwina Blackwell-Clark outlines a program that will train young, minority males in coding,  3D design, and Entrepreneurship this summer. See more details below.

WYSO is not responsible for the following content:

Ohio is moving closer to forcing public water systems to alert residents within two days after lead is found at the tap.

It's a key part of an overhaul rolled out by Ohio Gov. John Kasich's administration to change how the state and its cities deal with lead in drinking water.

The two-day notification would be a major switch from current federal rules that give water plants 60 days to notify all residents.

But a water industry group is among those saying the proposed deadline is too short.

Jim Mullhaupt / Flickr Creative Commons

The Mulberry Moon wanes throughout the week, coming into its final quarter at 10:29 p.m. on May 29. Rising near midnight, setting in the late morning to early afternoon, the moon will be overhead before sunrise.

As the moon comes up, the Milky Way fills the eastern half of the sky, running from the north and “Z” shaped Cassiopeia, through Cygnus the Swan, then through Aquila and finally to Scutum and Sagittarius deep in the southeast.

A judge has ruled each of the 13 children of a black motorist killed by a white University of Cincinnati police officer at a traffic stop will receive nearly $218,000 as part of a wrongful-death settlement.

A Hamilton County probate judge also ordered Monday that Samuel DuBose's six siblings each will receive $32,000, his mother $90,000 and his father $25,000. Dubose's children range in age from 4 to 23.

A judge says Ohio must continue providing certain funding to Planned Parenthood while he weighs a challenge to a state law aimed at keeping public money from going to the organization.

U.S. District Judge Michael Barrett granted a temporary restraining order Monday blocking the state from enforcing that part of the law.

The law targets money that Planned Parenthood gets through Ohio's health department. That money is mostly federal and supports initiatives that provide HIV tests, cancer screenings and other education and prevention services.

The Dayton City Commission has updated the city's water ordinance.
Wikipedia

Much of the city of Fairborn is without water today due to a major water line break.

The City issued a boil order to residents and businesses along Faircreek Ridge, National Road, Colonel Glen Highway, Presidential Drive, and Zink Drive. Water pressure issues began on Sunday night, with some losing water service completely.

A few businesses were forced to close as a result.

400 people in 7 residence halls on Wright State University’s campus are also affected. The buildings are not fully occupied due to summer break.

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