Yellow Springs

A cornfield behind Antioch University Midwest on Dayton could become a business park called the CBE.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The Greene County Public Library was one of several dozen Ohio library systems asking voters for money. The library was asking for a 9/10-mill increase and renewal of its previous five-year levy. With 100 percent of the precincts reporting, unofficial results show the levy passing with 58 percent of the voters approving the measure.

A cornfield behind Antioch University Midwest on Dayton could become a business park called the CBE.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Yellow Springs residents will weigh in Nov. 4 on whether the village should fund infrastructure for a new business park at the edge of town. The proposal, called the Center for Business and Education or CBE, would open up new land to development by funding infrastructure, but the village is divided over whether it should borrow money to make the site “shovel ready” for developers.

Yellow Springs packs its downtown twice a year for the street fair.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The village of Yellow Springs, on the surface, is hopping economically. Property values are headed up, and downtown vacancies are low. Antioch College is growing and just opened a renovated fitness and wellness center. But just below the surface, the village has a lot of the same issues as other parts of the region. A lack of well-paying jobs means it’s becoming more of a bedroom community.

Unsung Assets: Local Senior Centers and Senior Citizens

Aug 13, 2014
Suzanne Szempruch

Every community has assets that are sometimes overlooked or under-appreciated. WYSO Community Voices producer, Ashley Appleman, considers two of Yellow Springs, Ohio’s greatest assets: its Senior Center and its senior citizens.

Last May nearly 40 Yellow Springs Senior Center members practiced a Flash Mob dance to celebrate National Senior Health & Fitness Day. Their engagement with the Center is high; it provides programs and services that help to keep this community vital.

Will Davis / WYSO

Some people are morning people, even on the weekends: They might like, for example, getting up at the crack of dawn on Saturdays to head down to their local farmers’ market. WYSO listener Gabrielle Civil is not one of those people. She lives in Yellow Springs, where the farmers’ market runs from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. And she had a question about that:

This is WYSO Curious and my question is, why so early? Why is the farmers’ market over by noon?

courtesy of YSKP

This year marks the 20th anniversary of Yellow Springs Kids Playhouse. It’s been called “children’s theater for adults” with topical themes, sophisticated humor, and clever songs. This year’s show, Superhuman Happiness, adapts the Greek myths of Ovid’s Metamorphosis to explore the role of change in kids’ lives today. The playhouse and artistic director John Fleming also face some major changes. Community Voices producer David Seitz has their story.

Yellow Springs resident Joseph Minde-Berman (right) plays music at street fairs for spare cash. He's pictured with his friend Corbin Rogers, also of Yellow Springs.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Strawberries, sauerkraut, asparagus, popcorn, beans, bacon and moonshine—aside from usually being edible, what do they all have in common?

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Work has started on a site for a new 28-room hotel, restaurant and banquet hall in the village of Yellow Springs. The project has a price tag of at least $4 million, but it’s not a standard big investment.

On a blustery afternoon in March, the owner of the future Mills Park Hotel is out chain-sawing—clearing up tree stumps from a big empty lot on Route 68 in downtown Yellow Springs.

“I’m a do-it-yourself kind of person,” says Jim Hammond, who is soft-spoken and covered in sawdust.

Students and faculty members involved in Yellow Springs High School Drama Club's production of Pirates of Penzance visited the WYSO studios the morning of opening night to perform some of the show's songs live on Excursions. 

Yellow Springs High School Drama Club's production of Pirates of Penzance is March 14th - 23rd at the Mills Lawn Auditorium in Yellow Springs.

Photos by Andrew Grigiss

courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

The controversy began in 1960 at the Gegner Barber Shop located in Yellow Springs, Ohio. The owner, Lewis Gegner, claimed “I don’t know how to cut their (Negro’s) hair” and refused to provide service to African Americans.

By 1960, the Antioch Committee for Racial Equality (ACRE) and the Antioch Chapter of the NAACP were successful in desegregating other businesses in the Village of Yellow Springs. But Gegner refused even after being fined for violating the local anti-discrimination ordinance.

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