WYSO

WYSO Curious

Are you curious about the Miami Valley, its history, people or economy? Is there a place, a person or a story that mystifies or intrigues you? Do you like to ask questions? WYSO Curious is an occasional series that lets you ask questions for WYSO reporters to answer. Submit your own question below!

 

WYSO Curious is a partner of Hearken, founded by Jennifer Brandel.

Hear WYSO's Lewis Wallace discuss the growing Curious family with Jenn Brandel and Curious City editor Shawn Allee.

WYSO Curious Looks At Racial Gap In Local Policing

Aug 11, 2017
Dayton residents chat with police during a Coffee With a Cop event at Benjamin's the Burger Master.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

On this installment of WYSO Curious, we tackle a question asked by Talis Gage, "Why don’t more black people become police officers?"

Johnny Morehouse's monument is one of the most iconic at Woodland Cemetery
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Today on WYSO Curious we answer a question from listener Eileen Ribbler of Kettering about a statute of a little boy and dog at Woodland Cemetery in Dayton. Eileen wanted to know what the story was behind the marker, one of the most iconic monuments in the Cemetery, which commemorates five year old Johnny Morehouse. Community Voices producer Renee Wilde went to this famous Dayton landmark to dig up the answer.

Parts of the Miami Powder Company still exist along the along the Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail between Yellow Springs and Xenia
Renee Wilde / WYSO

In our latest installment of WYSO Curious, we answer a question from listener Holly Kozee of Springfield, who wanted to know what the story was behind the abandoned buildings along the bike path in Goes Station.

 Community voices reporter Renee Wilde went in search of the answers and she found an explosive history behind the buildings, and the town.

  

Dave Wallen constructs wooden frames for the guns that will launch Dayton's fireworks display on July 3rd
Liam Niemeyer / WYSO

WYSO Curious is our occasional series where you ask questions, and our reporters answer them online and on air. Listener Aaron Hill wanted to know more about how local communities get the fireworks for their Fourth of July celebrations. WYSO Curious producer Liam Niemeyer takes us behind the scenes of Dayton’s “Lights in Flight” fireworks show.

Char Daston/WYSO

It’s easy to forget about where you get the energy that powers your home. But back in the 1960s, some of Piqua’s electricity came from its nuclear power plant, the first small-town sized nuclear reactor in the country. Listener Karen Power wanted to know why the reactor was built in Piqua. I drove down to the old reactor site to find out.

“An ideal location”

“Here for the first time anywhere, the turbine generators of a municipally-owned power plant are using steam produced by nuclear energy for the generation of electricity.”

A trolley bus parked at RTA headquarters in Dayton.
Pat O'Malley, RTA

Dayton is one of only five US cities that still have electric trolley buses. Listener Aaron Hill had several questions about the trolleys: he wondered about their history, their cost compared to diesel buses, and the future of the trolley system. I drove down to RTA headquarters in Dayton and sat down with two veteran employees to find the answers to our curious listener’s multiple-part question.

How did Dayton get its trolleys?

 

Char Daston / WYSO

Have you ever noticed the blue helicopters in the sky above the Miami Valley? Those are CareFlights, air ambulances from the Miami Valley Hospital. Rocky Blazer, a listener from Springfield, says they seem to fly out a lot, and asked why the hospital would decide to send out a CareFlight, rather than a traditional ambulance. I drove down to the hospital’s central campus in Dayton to investigate.

On the helipad

Dayton Daily News, courtesy of Sam Dorf

When you hear “Russian ballet,” Dayton, Ohio probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. But on February 8, 1917, the Ballets Russes, a radical Russian dance company based in Paris, performed at the Victoria Theater. That was twenty years before Dayton had its own ballet company. Listener Sandra Harewood learned about the performance and asked WYSO Curious to investigate.

What was the Ballets Russes?

What Happened To Hung-Town? WYSO Curious Goes In Search Of Hungarian Dayton

Apr 7, 2016
The old Kossuth Colony in Old North Dayton still exists, but with far fewer Hungarian residents.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

In today’s WYSO Curious, we field a question from WYSO listener Delaine Adkins, who lived in Budapest Hungary for a couple years and was curious about an historic area in Dayton called Hung-Town.

She wondered whether there were still any residual influences from the original occupants.

The Yellow Springs in winter glen helen
Talitha Green / Glen Helen

Today WYSO Curious takes on a question that’s simple, but also age-old. It involves a feature familiar to Yellow Springs locals: the actual springs after which the town is named.

The springs inside a preserve called Glen Helen look bright yellowish orange where the water comes out. So listener Jonathan Kouse, an occasional visitor to the Glen, asked, “Why are the Yellow Springs yellow?”

 

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