WYSO Curious

Are you curious about the Miami Valley, its history, people or economy? Is there a place, a person or a story that mystifies or intrigues you? Do you like to ask questions? WYSO Curious is an occasional series that lets you ask questions for WYSO reporters to answer. Submit your own question below!


WYSO Curious is a partner of Hearken, founded by Jennifer Brandel.

Hear WYSO's Lewis Wallace discuss the growing Curious family with Jenn Brandel and Curious City editor Shawn Allee.

A mostly empty building, 40 West Fourth St, with a reflection in its windows of part of the empty Dayton Arcade.
Carey Scheer / WYSO

Dayton’s first modern skyscraper stands at 40 West Fourth Street. It’s all glass on the outside, stretching 22 stories into the sky.

Dayton police say response times depend on call volume and the priority level of the call.  dayton police car
Carey Scheer / WYSO

Late last year, a man was assaulted by two people after walking out of the Family Dollar on Patterson road in Dayton. His attackers left pretty quickly, and the staff at family dollar called 911.  


“We kept calling them and calling them, hoping they would come faster,” says Jennifer, the store manager. “He could have had a concussion. He could have passed out. He was bleeding too.”

The victim also called 911. He told the operator that someone tried to kill him but initially he said he did not need an ambulance.

What’s In Those Trains? WYSO Curious Tracks Down The Cargo

Sep 24, 2015
trains rails
Lauren Shows / WYSO

Lyle Whybrew has lived his whole life to the sounds of passing trains. He grew up in North Judson, Indiana, a town where four railroad lines converged, and now he’s in Tipp City.

Rumpke's Dayton recycling facility separates glass and paper, and ships the rest to Cincinnati to be sorted.
Carey Scheer / WYSO

Carmen Milano, a 63-year-old yoga teacher from Yellow Springs, points to the instructional sticker on the top of her big green Rumpke Recycling bin.

The rotunda section of the Arcade is in urgent need of repair. downtown dayton
David Bohardt / Arcade Task Force

The downtown Dayton Arcade has been unoccupied for more than twenty years now.

But 52-year-old Daytonian Aquetta Knight remembers a time when it was hopping.

“Everybody I knew was down there,” she says. “They were the good old days.”

Her dad was a shoe repairman in the Arcade, which also housed a fresh meat market, fresh fish, a popcorn store and a grocery. She’s like a lot of residents who want nothing more than to see it open back up.

The Taylorsville Dam in Vandalia is one of five dams in the Miami Conservancy District.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

This month marks the 100-year anniversary of the Miami Conservancy District, the flood protection system that was installed up and down the Great Miami River basin after the infamous Great Dayton Flood of 1913.

Listener Ellen Duell asked WYSO Curious a timely question:

“I wanted to know if the dams are still being protected, and how the conservancy district is operating to keep us from more great floods,” Duell said.

Mills Lawn Elementary School in Yellow Springs had the lowest kindergarten vaccination rate in the state in 2014.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

This week on WYSO Curious, we tackle a tough topic: vaccinations. Scott Croshier of Yellow Springs asked, “to what extent is Yellow Springs’ embrace of alternative medicine accompanied by a rejection of vaccination among local parents?”


Felix Dakota is happy with a kids' burger and fries from Young's Jersy Dairy.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Kids’ menus: they’re salty, sweet, greasy, and more appropriately portioned than lots of meals served to adults at casual restaurants. So, why the age restrictions? What stops adults from just ordering the small stuff they crave?

This question came in from Rachel Kirby in Nashville, Tennessee for Marketplace's “I’ve Always Wondered” series, a similar project to our local WYSO Curious series.

Tanya Brock is the bar manager at Carrillon Brewing Company, which makes beer the really old-fashioned way.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

In the latest installment of WYSO Curious, Christina from Kettering asked us, “What's with the craft beer movement in Dayton? Has it always been there?”

Bob Moore with Faith and John Morgan in the WYSO studios. arthur morgan
Jocelyn Robinson / WYSO

A few years back, Bob Moore of Yellow Springs took his kids to the public library where he found a shelf of books by local authors. There he discovered the writing of Arthur E. Morgan. Morgan’s creative and original thinking, reflected in these volumes, aroused Bob’s curiosity; he wondered about the voice of this man who had so much influence on the history of Yellow Springs and the Miami Valley, if there were any recordings of him speaking. Bob put the question to WYSO Curious. Hear the radio broadcast here: