WYSO

Wright State University

Wright State University's Arts Gala is a six hour showcase of student work in the school's Creative Arts Center.  Jennie Buckwalter, Assistant Dean for Community and Student Engagement for Wright State's College of Liberal Arts, joined Niki Dakota live in the studio along with several Wright State University students to talk about this year event. 

The 18th Annual Wright State Arts Gala is Saturday, April 8th, 6pm - midnight.  Learn more at: https://www.wright.edu/artsgala

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Some Miami Valley colleges and universities are reporting a significant drop in international-student applications this year. The decline is part of a trend reflected in a recent Institute of International Education survey, which found nearly 40 percent of schools across the United States are experiencing similar declines.  

Wright State University
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Wright State University President David Hopkins has announced he’ll officially leave office Friday, three months earlier than his scheduled retirement. Hopkins had said last May he planned to step down in June, when his contract officially expired. He’s served as Wright State president for about 10 years.

In a letter to students, faculty and staff Friday, Hopkins cited the university’s budget-realignment process as one reason for vacating office early. He also wrote that he wants to, “position new president, Dr. Cheryl B. Schrader, for every success possible.”

WYSO/Joshua Chenault

Wright State University’s incoming president plans to make financial sustainability one of her top priorities. The school’s board of trustees Monday voted unanimously to elect Dr. Cheryl B. Schrader as Wright State’s seventh president.

 

Schrader will be the first woman to hold the position in Wright State’s history. She currently serves as chancellor at Missouri University of Science and Technology.

 

After the vote, Schrader outlined her plans to students and faculty.

 

Wright State University
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It was a hectic weekend for international education coordinators at Dayton-area universities. Since President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily barring citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the U.S., some are scrambling to figure out the next steps for their affected students.

Michelle Streeter-Ferrari, the director of the Center for International Education at Wright State University, says there’s been a lot of confusion surrounding the executive order.

Wright State University
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Wright State University lost nearly $1.7M on its failed attempt to host the last September’s presidential debate, according to a new financial analysis by the university. 

 

Wright State Communications Director Seth Bauguess says the event’s final cost did not come as a surprise to university officials.

 

About $5 million total were spent on preparations for the debate. Much of that funding went toward upgrading the Nutter Center. Bauguess said those improvements were slated to be made in the future anyway.

Wright State University
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Several students at Wright State University are in New York today to attend the first presidential debate.

After the university backed out of hosting the debate in July, the replacement school, Hofstra University, offered 15 tickets to Wright State students.

Rebecca Brinkman, a nursing student, got one of them, "I won the golden ticket.”

Wright State selected each student through a lottery system. Their trips are donor-funded.

April Laissle

Wright State University students gathered today to protest recent financial decisions at the school.

Students and faculty members stood near the quad at the University holding signs that spelled out the word “accountability.” It’s a term that was central to their protest today, according to Wright State student Carly Perkins.

“There have been so many budget issues that have happened here on our campus," said Perkins. "And we just want someone to come forward and be honest about that. We just want them to know that we’re watching.”

Wright State University
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Ohio's Wright State University says it has no plans to repay the $220,000 in state money it received to upgrade security for the first presidential debate, which it pulled out of last month due to increasing security costs.
 

Wright State University
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New York's Hofstra University says it's honored to be called on to host the first 2016 presidential general election debate.

The Sept. 26 debate is moving to Hofstra after Wright State University withdrew as host Tuesday, citing rising security concerns and costs.

The Commission on Presidential Debates announced quickly that Hofstra would take over. The Hempstead, New York, university had agreed last year to serve as an alternate site. It hosted debates in 2012 and 2008.

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