WYSO

Wright State University

Jerry Kenney

 

Wright State University faculty members say they are willing to go on strike if a fair contract can’t be negotiated.  

Several hundred teachers, represented by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and supportive students gathered in Millet Hall for a rally before marching across campus to a scheduled community forum where Wright State president Cheryl Schrader and trustees addressed budget concerns.

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Some Wright State University faculty members are speaking out about what they’re calling a “lack of progress” in ongoing contract talks with the university. The negotiations have already lasted nearly a year.

The Wright State faculty union late last year amended its bylaws to allow a strike vote if necessary.

Union spokesperson Noeleen McIlvenna says, during negotiation sessions, the university has not been specific about what issues are on the table.

Darshini Parthasarathy is a student at Miami University.
Darshini Parthasarathy

The United States Supreme Court recently allowed the Trump administration’s travel ban to take effect while lawsuits challenging it continue to make their way through the courts. The ban restricts entry into the U.S. by travelers from eight mostly Muslim-majority countries: Somalia, Syria, Iran, Libya, Yemen, Chad, North Korea and Venezuela.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Wright State University's administration says a strike is not imminent even though the faculty union has set up the process that would allow them to strike if a contract isn't reached.

 The Wright State chapter of the American Association of University Professors union recently passed an amendment to its constitution to allow a strike. A union leader says the faculty had never needed a strike procedure. Negotiations have been stalled since March.

Some university officials are speaking out in the wake of the Trump administration's announcement it will end the DACA program for young people brought to the United States illegally as children
Joshua Chenault / WYSO

Some Dayton university leaders are reacting to the Trump administration’s recently announced plan to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, immigration program without swift action from Congress.

DACA allows young people brought to the country illegally as children to temporarily work and study in the United States under certain eligibility conditions.  

 

Schrader speaks at a 2017 welcome reception shortly after being named Wright State's president.
April Laissle / WYSO

At a crowded reception Thursday, new Wright State University President Cheryl B. Schrader addressed campus for the first time since taking office July 1. In her speech, Schrader repeatedly acknowledged the university’s financial problems.

"While all of us would probably prefer to be on more sound financial footing at this time, I know that we can't afford to dwell on the mistakes of the past...rather we must learn from them."

Douglas Fecher, vice chair, Wright State University Board of Trustees. Fecher is also president and CEO of Wright-Patt Credit Union
WYSO/Jess Mador

The Wright State University board of trustees finance committee Friday announced details of a long-awaited budget proposal. The 2018 budget calls for eliminating 71 employees -- fewer than many feared -- and more than 100 additional vacant positions.

More than half the job cuts would come from administrative positions.

Approximately two dozen are hourly positions, and more than 40 are salaried staff. Four positions would be faculty members. Officials say another 14 current full-time employees will see their hours reduced.  

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Wright State programs could be cut, and more than 100 employees could be let go under the university's upcoming Fiscal Year 2018 budget proposal. School officials are expected to release details of the plan at a finance committee meeting May 19.

As many as 120 employees could be let go, Wright State officials say.

Flickr Creative Commons / Christopher Meeks

Amid an ongoing budget crisis, Wright State University’s credit ranking has been downgraded.

Moody’s Investors Services dropped the school’s rating from A2 to Baa2, signifying a “negative outlook.” The organization says the downgrade was prompted by Wright State’s deteriorating financial situation and significant operating deficits.

The new rating could affect Wright State’s ability to secure loans for large projects, such as new construction.

Writer/director Christopher Blazavich and producer Kara Lynch are seniors preparing to graduate from Wright State University's film program.  Their work will be among seven films screen at the Big Lens Film Festival, a yearly event that showcases the work of Wright State students.  Blazavich and Lynch joined Niki Dakota live in the studio to talk their film careers so far, future plans and more.

The Big Lens Film Festival is Sunday, April 30th, 3-5pm at the Rave Cinemas at the Greene.  

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