Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for February 10, 2013, including the following stories:

- Jerry Kenney reports on the latest news from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in regards to looming sequestration cuts.

- Jerry Kenney reports on National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

- Ohio Food and Farming Conference Draws Near

Officials at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton say that under guidance from the Department of Defense, they have begun planning for a potential reduction of 15%  of their operating budget as a result of sequestration.   In a press conference Thursday, Col. Cassie Barlow told reporters that a furlough of civilian employees isn't out of the question, but it would be a last resort.

The budget cuts handed down to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base this week include a civilian hiring freeze, the elimination of some temporary positions and the curtailing of certain travel and purchasing costs. Emily McCord speaks to Vice President for federal programs at the Dayton Development Coalition, Michael Gessel, to discuss how these small measures now could signal larger cuts in the future.  

Air Force Cuts Could Impact Dayton Air Show

Jan 24, 2013

The Air Force announced cuts at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base this week to address budget uncertainty at the federal level. AS WYSO’s Emily McCord reports reductions to non essential flying could impact the popular Dayton Air Show.

The Air Force has announced budget cuts at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. WYSO’s Emily McCord reports the measures will take effect immediately to address the Defense Department’s budget uncertainty.

A recent military crackdown on inappropriate material in work spaces found dozens of instances at an Ohio Air Force Base.

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base spokesman Daryl Mayer said nothing documented was deemed obscene, but there were 224 instances of "inappropriate" materials, such as photos, calendars and magnets.

Inspectors also counted 46 instances of "unprofessional" material with posters, cartoons, documents or coins at the base near Dayton.

U.S. Air Force

The leader of the Air Force Materiel Command says there may be fewer Air Force programs in the future due to the federal budget. AFMC commander and Beavercreek native Janet Wolfenbarger tells the Dayton Daily News the impacts of sequestration on the base will not be known until Congress is able to come to a resolution. She says she think the Department of Defense should do its part to help during the fiscal crisis, but that its unlikely the military will launch the same number of new programs as it did before the country’s budgetary problems.

The city of Riverside has gone to federal court in its fight to tax civilian employees and contractors who work on part of an air force base.

The  says a provision of Ohio's municipal income tax law that prevents it from collecting taxes from employees at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is unconstitutional.

The Dayton Daily News reports that Riverside says the law provides an arbitrary and unjustifiable tax exemption to some government employees and contractors.

Ohio argues the state is allowed to pass laws that restrict cities' taxing authority.

U.S. Air Force officials say obscene material has no place in work areas and are taking steps this week to eliminate it from an Ohio base.

The Dayton Daily News reports that Air Force officials started hunting for obscene material in all work areas at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base .

The Air Force ordered the inspections at all of its installations in light of sexual misconduct complaints to the service's top military leader. Offensive material could include pictures of scantily clad women in calendars, posters and elsewhere.

The Air Force says the cancelation of a computer modernization program will cost 115 contract employees their jobs at Wright-Patterson Air Force base.

Base spokesman Daryl Mayer said Thursday that cancelation of the Expeditionary Combat Support System program also means that an additional 55 civilian and military employees will be reassigned from that program.

Mayer says the canceled program had been intended to replace some older computer systems to meet statutory requirements for financial and audit readiness mandated by Congress.

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