Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

The commander of Ohio's largest military base says it could take weeks to catch up on the backlog of work created by the furloughs of thousands of civilian workers.

And Col. Cassie Barlow, 88th Air Base Wing commander at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, says base leaders have started planning for possible cuts and the potential of furloughs next year.

Members of a national commission studying the U.S. Air Force to see if structural changes are needed will visit Ohio military bases this week seeking information.

The commission says members will visit Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton on Monday. They also plan to collect information at Air National Guard bases including Springfield, Rickenbacker and Mansfield-Lahm during their three-day Ohio stop.

The Air Force Research Laboratory will have a new commander. Major General Thomas Masiello will assume command Monday at a ceremony at the National Museum of the US Air Force. As the AFRL commander, Maseillo will in be in charge of the Air Force’s 2 billion dollar science and technology program, and an additional research and development that’s also valued at 2 billion dollars. He’ll oversee a workforce of 10 thousand in the labs nine technology directorates. Masiello is currently the Director of Special programs at the Pentagon for Acquistion, Technology and Logistics.

Supercomputer Unveiled at Wright-Patterson

Jul 23, 2013

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is home to a new supercomputer. It’s named “Spirit” after the Air Force’s B-2 Stealth Bomber. It’s the largest supercomputer in the Department of Defense. At $25 million, it’s also the 14th fastest computer in the world. Spirit was unveiled at a ribbon cutting ceremony Monday. It can perform 1500 trillion calculations at a time and will assist in research at the Air Force Research Laboratory. It also will help the DOD perform research for weapons systems. According to a release from the base, supercomputers play a critical role in the field of computational science.

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base will be conducting testing of readiness skills in an exercise scheduled this week in southwest Ohio.

Officials with Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton say the tests will be conducted Monday through Thursday at the base. Officials said in a release that base visitors and employees may experience gate delays, temporary facility closures and interruptions to certain services.

The release says tightened security could result in delays across the base.

More than 150 civilian employees at Ohio's largest military base have taken steps to appeal furloughs imposed because of federal budget cuts.

The Dayton Daily News reports that the civil service workers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are among 6,800 nationwide attached to the Air Force seeking to be exempted from the forced time off.

Organizers of the Dayton Air Show expect smaller crowds this weekend, thanks to the Air Force Thunderbirds and other military support pulling out because of federal budget cuts.

The two-day show usually draws around 70,000 people and has a $3.2 million impact on the local economy. But the Thunderbirds precision jet team had to withdraw earlier this year because of federal cutbacks, along with military support from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

A bikeway that will connect Wright-Patterson base with downtown Dayton is ready for launch.

Completion of the 3.6-mile Mad River Bikeway extension will link with 330 miles of regional bikeway paths while connecting the base.

The Dayton Daily News reports that the grand opening will be June 21 at the Eastwood MetroPark parking lot, with a group ride following.

A unit from Wright-Patterson Air Force base plans to deliver more than 500 meals from a nonprofit group for residents of Haiti.

Officials at Wright-Patt  say a 445th Airlift Wing unit will leave this morning to deliver about 541,000 meals consisting of dried and sealed food packets to the impoverished country.

A colonel based at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is facing charges of sexual imposition. WYSO’s Emily McCord reports.

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