Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

Jerry Kenney

Visitors to the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton are getting a look at the inside the plane that carried John F. Kennedy’s body from Dallas to Washington, D.C through December 1st. Kennedy's Air Force One is getting extra attention as the nation marks the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton-area officials held a public meeting Tuesday about the effects of sequestration, or automatic federal spending cuts, on the local economy. They say the outlook is gloomy if sequestration continues into 2014.

“Survival mode” and “devastation” were just a couple of the phrases tossed out at the event.

“As this goes downhill, the next thing’s gonna go downhill, and we’re gonna be in a world of hurt,” said Greene County Commission Tom Koogler.

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is reopening two galleries on a limited basis due to popular demand.

The Dayton-area museum says the Presidential Gallery and the Research and Development Gallery will be open Thursday through Sunday beginning this Thursday. They closed May 1 because of federal budget reductions.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

As the federal government shutdown drags into its third week, it has become a sort of background noise, present but not always noticeable. Unless you’re a federal worker, that is; Justine Kelly’s a case in point.

She works at the Social Security Administration, and has been working without pay for weeks.

“This is just so demoralizing,” she said at a Democratic party event in Dayton Monday. “I feel like nobody cares. I feel nobody’s listening, like this is all a game.”

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

The Dayton Development Coalition (DDC) has launched an initiative called the “Federal Retention Program” to protect and expand Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. But that effort is an uphill battle against federal fiscal instability.

Wright-Patt puts upwards of $4 billion a year into the Dayton region, and a major goal of the new initiative is to keep that money coming in. At the same time, DDC president Jeff Hoagland admits the outlook in Washington is a bit bleak.

Most civilian workers are back at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, although officials say normal operations will remain difficult during the partial government shutdown. But across the Dayton area, Wright-Patt isn’t alone in its woes since the partial federal government shutdown began Oct. 1.

 Nearly 9,000 civilian workers went back to work Monday at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. That’s after the Department of Defense reinterpreted a new law in order to end furlough days.

Aviation-related classes have been canceled at Ohio's largest military base as a result of furloughs triggered by the federal government shutdown.

The Dayton Daily News reports the Air Force Institute of Technology suspended classes this week at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. About 8,700 civilian employees were sent home without pay when the partial federal government shutdown began Tuesday.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

 Nearly 9,000 employees of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base remain on emergency furlough following the federal government shutdown, and workers and businesses are worried about the financial impact, particularly if the partial shutdown is prolonged.

Wright-Patt officials estimate that for every day the government stays closed, the Dayton area loses $5 million in wages.

Colonel Cassie Barlow of the 88th Air Base Wing speaks to reporters about a possible emergency furlough.
WYSO/Lewis Wallace

As of midnight, October 1st, the U.S. House and Senate had not agreed on a  budget, and the federal government is now implementing a partial shut down for the first time since 1995-1996.

On Tuesday Forbes listed Dayton as one of the top ten cities at risk during a government shutdown. Civilian workers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base bear the immediate brunt: approximately 8,700 non-military staff at Wright-Patt received furlough letters Tuesday morning.

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