Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

Invitation to Ohio

Jun 2, 2011

A total of twelve hundred new jobs will come to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base because of BRAC – the Base Realignment and Closure. When military personnel are told their jobs are moving they must move too. But civilians working for the Air Force have a choice. And this BRAC has been particularly successful in getting civilians to pack up their homes and relocate their families. Sarah Buckingham reports on a unique effort by Ohioans that made the Miami Valley particularly attractive.

June 1st marked the ribbon-cutting for the 711th Human Performance Wing that’s coming to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base as a result of BRAC. It brings new missions to the base and will strengthen existing ones, which means there’s even more opportunity to strengthen historic partnerships between the base and Wright State University and keep student and faculty research in the Miami Valley well after graduation.  Juliet Fromholt reports on the base’s partnerships in higher education.

The mission of the 711th Human Performance Wing is to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of military forces using a combination of education, consultation, and research. Businesses, both large and small, help provide that mission-support, but first they’ve got to compete for a piece of the economic pie.  Jerry Kenney reports on the economic potential of BRAC.

BRAC: How It All Began

May 30, 2011

This week, the new Human Performance Wing at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base will officially open at a ribbon cutting ceremony. Of course, military brass and other dignitaries will be in attendance. But the opening will signal a new chapter in the Miami Valley as hundreds of families move to our area. In our week long series, “The New Face of Wright-Patt”, Emily McCord takes us to the beginning of the BRAC process.

A Senior Airmen with the 88th communication squadron who was injured in Afghanistan a year ago has died. Wright Patterson Air Force Base announced that Tre Porfirio passed away Sunday morning while visiting friends over the Thanksgiving holiday. He was 22 years old.

In 2009, Governor Strickland named Dayton as the Ohio Aerospace Hub of Innovation-It was an effort to promote the aerospace research in the area and to create jobs. Now, GE Aviation is partnering with the hub. It's called the Electrical Power Integrated Systems Research and Development, or EPISCENTER. Its focus is on making power systems for hybrid and electric vehicles, electric ships and aircraft and smarter power grids.

Fifteen years ago this month, the Dayton Peace Accords ended the war in Bosnia. Tonight the city is commemorating the occasion with a dinner at the Hope Hotel at Wright Patterson Air Force base, where the accords were signed. The organizer of the event, city commissioner Matt Joseph says Bosnians today appreciate what happened in Dayton, even though the country still faces problems.

Last week, in a ceremony at the National Museum of the United State Air force in Dayton Ohio, Senior Airmen Tre Porfirio received the Purple Heart. On Nov. 21 2009 Tre was shot 3 times by Afghan insurgents. Those three bullets have resulted in more than 20 surgeries. Tre's recovery has involved some ground breaking medical techniques. At last night's ceremony Airmen Porfirio talked about his personal fight for life.

Porfirio says, "It's been a battle, lot a help from Community, squadron, my Girl and baby... it makes it easier."

Take an already successful college internship program, multiply its funding by 4, and throw in the research taking place at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, and what do you get?

"When you think about it we're bringing in $14 million in new revenue to our region through this program," says Sean Creighton, executive director of the Southwestern Ohio Council for Education.

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