WYSO

Wright Brothers

One century ago Dayton, Ohio was a hotbed of industry and innovation. In his book "Grand Eccentrics - Turning the Century: Dayton and the Inventing of America" Mark Bernstein looked back at some of the men who were instrumental in making this area a thriving place during that period.

Susan Wright: The Mother Of Flight

May 11, 2018
Susan Catherine Koerner Wright
Carillon Historical Park

The story of Wilbur and Orville Wright has been told countless times. Two completely self-taught, self-funded brothers invent the airplane in the back of their West Dayton bike shop. The world was never the same. But the story of the Wright brothers’ background is even more unorthodox than it seems. In the late 1800s, during the heart of the Victorian Era, the Wright brothers’ mother inspired their mechanical aptitude. Community Voices producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Susan Catherine Koerner Wright.

The Toys Of Orville Wright

Dec 25, 2017
Flips and Flops, the toy invented by Orville Wright, on display at Carillon Historical Park
Leo DeLuca / WYSO

In late 1878, a father gave his two boys a toy that flew under its own power. It had a small propeller, and made a big impression. Twenty-five years later, one of the boys became the world's first pilot, and never lost his fascination with flight.

Jerry Kenney

The Wright brothers and their famous 1904 Flyer II airplane have returned to Huffman Prairie Flying Field in life-sized likenesses created by aviation photographer Dan Patterson.

Dayton History

It’s shaping up to be a big week for aviation-history lovers in Dayton. Events kicked off Monday morning with a visit from the grandson of aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh to Hawthorn Hill. The Oakwood house was home to the Wright Brothers until the late 1940s.

 

In June of 1927, large crowds gathered at Hawthorn Hill to see transatlantic flight pioneer Charles Lindbergh. Lindbergh made a surprise stop at the Wright family home just one month after his record-setting solo nonstop flight from New York to Paris.  

 

Stephen Wright Holds a picture of Bishop Milton Wright who lived the last years of his life at Hawthorn Hill with his sons, the Wright Brothers.
Jerry Kenney

On Sunday April 23rd, Dayton History will once again open the doors to Hawthorne Hill. The large house in Oakwood was once home to the Wright brothers. The annual Wright at Home open house will allow visitors to step back in time and live the history of Dayton’s most famous family.

 

Prominently featured at this year’s event will be stories about the Wright brothers' father, Bishop Milton Wright, who died nearly 100 years ago.  

wright-brothers.org

The president of the National Aviation Hall of Fame in Ohio says it considered selling a century-old wooden propeller signed by one of the Wright brothers but decided against it, at least for now.

The Dayton Daily News reports the 8 ½ foot spruce propeller from 1915 is the only known airplane artifact with the signature of one of the aviation pioneer siblings, Orville Wright.

It's thought to have been on a Wright-built float plane. It was bought for $37,000 and donated to the hall near Dayton in 2004, but more recently was appraised for at least $275,000.

Rediscovering the Art of Letter Writing

Nov 3, 2016
Liz West / Flickr Creative Commons

In a new novel called Maiden Flight, Connecticut writer Harry Haskell recreates his grandfather’s storybook romance with Katharine Wright, the Wright brothers’ younger sister. Reading Katharine’s love letters inspired these reflections on an age-old mode of communication.

When Harry Haskell was a boy he had heard about the letters. Harry's grandfather was also named Harry Haskell and he had received the letters from the woman who would become his second wife. She was Katharine Wright-they were love letters she had written to Harry Haskell's grandfather. Harry's sisters told him he probably would not be interested in what they considered to be mushy letters. He didn't read them until he was an adult.
 

Wright Brothers bench
designatednaphour / Flickr Creative Commons

Last week Kettering writer Rebecca Rine sent her kids back to school, and it caused her to think about FOCUS:  how to teach it to her kids and how to refine it in her own life.   In this commentary, which first appeared in the Dayton Daily news - she explains that her inspiration is the Wright Brothers.

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