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Voting

May 2 Primary Election Results Summary

May 3, 2017
Both Democrats and Republicans have launched major voter turnout efforts in advance of the November 2014 election.  vote election voters
elycefeliz / Flickr/Creative Commons

Unofficial results of last night’s primary election are in. The news is mixed for several Miami Valley school districts.

 Voters rejected school construction bond issues for Xenia and Valley View Schools. Voters also rejected a similar bond issue that was set to pay for renovations at the Miami Valley Career Technology Center.

School-renewal levies passed in Oakwood, Tipp City, Lebanon, and Yellow Springs. Voters in Beavercreek rejected a 6-mill school levy.

Columbia City Blog

Monday, April 3, is the last day to register to vote in the primary election this May.

For the first time, Ohioans can register to vote online at MyOhioVote.com. Voters can also register at their county board of elections office.

School levies, police levies and other tax issues will all be on the May ballot.

Steve Harsman, deputy director of the Montgomery County Board of Elections, says voter registration is critical.

Statehouse New Bureau

President Donald Trump says he thinks millions of illegal votes were cast in the November election though there hasn’t been any confirmation of that. So he is calling for a major investigation to look into votes, particularly those in California and New York.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted says there is no reason for the federal government to focus on ballots cast here because his office already does post-election investigations into claims of voter fraud and suppression.

“We’ve done one after each general election since I’ve been Secretary of State,” he says.

The 2016 election season has officially come to a close. In today’s Politics Ohio WYSO’s Jerry Kenney speaks with Secretary of State Jon Husted about fears of voter fraud that never materialized and new developments in voter registration.

 

Election 2016: Find Your Polling Place

Nov 7, 2016

Blair Elmore
Basim Blunt / WYSO

This week on Dayton Youth Radio, we'll hear from Blair Elmore who produced this story last spring during the presidential primary season when he was a senior at David H. Ponitz Career Technology Center.

It is currently a felony to take a picture of your ballot in Ohio. Some lawmakers plan to sponsor a bill to allow voters to take those pictures if they want.

It’s been several years since the state’s “ballot sharing” ban was changed. Attorney General Spokesman Dan Tierney says that ban, which includes taking pictures of ballots, was not meant to stifle free speech of voters, “It was intended to protect voters who may try to intimidate them to vote a certain way.”

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted
Statehouse News Bureau

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled the process Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is using to remove voters from the rolls is illegal.

Husted’s office has removed nearly 1.4 million voter registrations from the voter rolls. Some were dead, were thought to have moved or were inactive voters. American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio Spokesman Mike Brickner hopes now that the court agrees that “use it or lose it” method of removing voters is not legal, it will order the state to put those people back on the voter rolls.

Juliet Fromholt

Voters in Ohio can soon request an absentee ballot for the fall presidential election.

The office of Secretary of State Jon Husted planned to mail absentee ballot applications to voters statewide this weekend.

Voters can fill out and return the applications to have their absentee ballots mailed to them ahead of Election Day.

Ohioans can vote absentee by mail or in person without having to give a reason.

Early voting for the Nov. 8 election is slated to begin on Oct. 12.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted
Statehouse News Bureau

If you have an Ohio driver’s license but are not registered to vote, you should be getting something in your mailbox soon from Ohio’s elections chief.

Secretary of State Jon Husted says the state’s voter rolls system is now linked with the Bureau of Motor Vehicles database, so he’s now able to make sure Ohio drivers can be voters if they want.

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