Visual Art

Whitaker’s photograph for “After the Moment” that he describes in the story:  “Playing with the Edge, page 70  Elliot&Dominick, 1979”
courtesy of Joel Whitaker

In the late 1980’s, photographer Robert Mapplethorpe’s exhibition “The Perfect Moment” fueled the fire of the so-called “Culture Wars” that pitted politicians like Senator Jesse Helms and the religious right against artists and museums in a battle over federal arts funding and first amendment rights.  When Mapplethorpe’s exhibit opened at the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, the museum and its director were brought up on obscenity charges. Twenty-five years later, the museum, through a major exhibit and symposium, is considering the impact of those events on the arts in America.

Local Artists Find Their Creative Space

Sep 2, 2015
Marika Snider / WYSO

For part-time artists, juggling career, home, and family can be challenging. Some find the solution in a Third Space, a place where their talents can mature. Community Voices producer Marika Snider talks with two local artists about finding their Third Space.

We Care Arts Serves As Studio, Safe Space For Disabled Artists

Jul 26, 2015
American Flag by Mallory Holler, a local painter who is legally blind, deaf, and quadriplegic.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Vincent Van Gogh said that brushstrokes are like speech. And if an artist is disabled  and cannot make art, they are silenced. Anyone who knows about We Care Arts in Kettering knows that they burst these confines and help hundreds of people with disabilities to create on canvas, in clay, with cloth, and more. Last year, some 1,300 people took classes or worked in their studio.

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman

On Friday, January 9th, the Advanced/AP Studio Art class from Yellow Springs Highschool will present View of the Village, an art exhibition at Village Artisans.  Kaleidoscope's Tom Amrhein is in the class and spoke with his classmates and teacher about the process of putting the show together and shared those interviews in a conversation with Juliet Fromholt on the air.

Challenging Notions of Contemporary Photography

Aug 20, 2014
courtesy of Francis Shanberger

For most of us photography is a permanent record, a memory captured forever. Community Voices producer Tanya Maus brings us a story about Dayton photographer Francis Shanberger who makes pictures that challenge our notions of contemporary photography.

The city of Dayton’s First Friday, a monthly event that opens up downtown art galleries and businesses to draw in visitors, is coming up this week, but it comes with bad news from one downtown gallery. The Connecting Art and Design Community (CADC), formerly known as the Cannery Gallery, is shutting its doors at the end of the month.

Christy Jennewein, who heads the gallery and event space and was involved in founding First Fridays, says she has struggled with funding.

coutesy of Bob Bingenheimer

Thursday evening, the Springfield Museum of Art will hold an event called Members Matter. At the gathering, museum officials plan to announce a budget surplus and an increase in membership.

Last year, Springfield's Museum of Art adopted a best practices model used by other museums around the country. The move eliminated three positions including a curator, a membership coordinator and a security manager.

Darlin Blanco-Lozano

A well known artist and pioneer of Wright State University’s Film and video department has passed away. Jud Yalkut was born in New York City in 1938, but has been a Dayton resident since 1973. He was an Assistant Professor of Art at Wright State, where he founded the first film and video program. Yalkut also taught at Sinclair Community College and Xavier University in Cincinnati.

As an artist, Yalkut was the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants from the Ohio Arts Council, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Montgomery County Arts and Cultural District.

The Wayne Township/Huber Heights Historical Society is presenting "Dinner With The Presidents" on Friday at the St Peter School. There will be enactors for Lincoln, Jefferson Davis and Teddy Roosevelt.

John Alexander

In a painting called Opry, braided strands of color start out bright at the top of the canvas but get muddy as they reach the bottom. Art critic and writer Ellie Bronson says that the artist, Bernard Frize likes to play games

"These games have had to do with anything from removing the skins that form on the top of open paint cans and plastering them on a canvas until the can was empty to painting blindfolded directed by an assistant or someone else," says Bronson.