Vietnam Veterans

"Patches" is one of the C-123 cargo planes used to spray Agent Orange. It's now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The group Vietnam Veterans of America is criticizing the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over its slow response to concerns from Air Force reservists who may have been exposed to Agent Orange in the 1970s.

The organization has joined the chorus demanding answers for about 2,000 people who crewed C-123s, the clunky cargo planes that were used to spray Agent Orange, after those planes came back from the war.

A C-123 image from an old Air Force training slide.
Insomnia Cured Here / Flickr/Creative Commons

A new study finds some Air Force reservists could have been exposed to Agent Orange while flying missions in the U.S. Vets who have been denied benefits claims are hoping the Veterans Administration will change its stance on Agent Orange exposure outside Vietnam, and this independent report by the non-profit Institute of Medicine could help their cause.

 

Two Clark County men who served in Vietnam have teamed up to raise money to build a granite monument listing Clark County veterans who died in the war. David Bauer and Randy Ark's project has received overwhelming support from the community and is near completion.

Bauer came up with the idea of creating a memorial to honor those who died in Vietnam and drew a sketch on a piece of paper of what it should look like. Then he and Ark took the rendering to Josh Walters of Dodds Monuments in Springfield. Walters liked what he saw.