Veterans

"Patches" is one of the C-123 cargo planes used to spray Agent Orange. It's now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The group Vietnam Veterans of America is criticizing the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over its slow response to concerns from Air Force reservists who may have been exposed to Agent Orange in the 1970s.

The organization has joined the chorus demanding answers for about 2,000 people who crewed C-123s, the clunky cargo planes that were used to spray Agent Orange, after those planes came back from the war.

A bill has been introduced in the Ohio legislature that would give businesses within the state an incentive to hire veterans.

Democratic State Representative Herschel Craig says businesses should want to hire veterans.

“Hiring veterans is not just good will. It is good business.”

Craig explains veterans have valuable skills. And yet, Representative Niraj Antani says too many veterans are unemployed.

“Veteran unemployment rate for post 9/11 veterans is tremendously high – 11.8% - whereas the state unemployment rate is low – 4.8%.”

Tuskegee Airmen
Jerry Kenney/WYSO / NMUSAF

This month, the National Museum of the United States Air Force is featuring an exhibit dedicated to the Tuskegee Airmen—an all African-American army air corps squadron who served in the WWII.  The museum has expanded the exhibit, and to find out more about the Airmen and their historical significance, we spoke with museum historian Dr. Jeff Underwood. In the following interview, Underwood calls the inception of the Tuskegee Airmen into WWII a 'watershed moment' in American military and civil rights history.

A C-123 image from an old Air Force training slide.
Insomnia Cured Here / Flickr/Creative Commons

A new study finds some Air Force reservists could have been exposed to Agent Orange while flying missions in the U.S. Vets who have been denied benefits claims are hoping the Veterans Administration will change its stance on Agent Orange exposure outside Vietnam, and this independent report by the non-profit Institute of Medicine could help their cause.

 

L.E.T. Group, Inc.

The statewide unemployment rate in Ohio, as of November, was about 5 percent, but for Veterans that number stands at almost 7 percent. With those figures in mind, the Ohio Military Veterans Resource Center is holding a job fair for veterans Wednesday at Wright-Patt. More than 40 “military-friendly employers” will be on hand to help Vets and their families find jobs.

Abby Reynolds with the resource center says Vets have additional challenges entering the civilian job market.

Jeremy Dobbins

Jeremy Dobbins served four years as an infantry rifleman in Afghanistan, and when he got out in 2012 he found it difficult to talk to people about his military experience. But when he was ready, he chose to tell his stories to an old family friend from Springfield named Charlie Dyke.

Jeremy had joined the Marine Corps at age 17. Charlie enlisted during World War II shortly after his 18th birthday. Both men returned to Springfield after their service ended to raise families and begin new lives.

courtesy of Clark State

The efforts of a local Iraq war veteran to create something special to honor the memory of our nation’s fallen soldiers will be on display today in Springfield, as a student driven art memorial project will be officially dedicated today on the campus of Clark State Community College.

Clark State student Scott Cody is an Iraq war veteran. Last year, he brought the idea of an art memorial to the school's President Jo Alice Blondin, as a way to help veterans on campus feel embraced by the college community. She thought it would be a great gift to veterans on and off campus.

The rock facade of the Veteran and Military Center will feature five bronze medallions — one for each of the five branches of the U.S. armed services.
Wright State University

A new Veteran and Military Center for students opens Thursday at Wright State University. 

The 4,500 square foot facility on Wright State’s Dayton campus will feature a lounge and kitchen space, private study areas, and computers. Veteran and Military Center Director Dr. Seth Gordon says the center is an important part of the university’s outreach to vets on campus. 

The Ohio Department of Veterans Services is trying to get the word out about cash bonuses available to vets who have served since September 11, 2001.

A spokesman for the department says 81,000 Ohio vets have already received bonuses totaling tens of millions of dollars, but an important deadline is approaching: This is the last year for veterans who served in Iraq between March 2003 and December of 2011 to apply for the bonus.

A veterans center in Dayton is planning a $5 million renovation of the dementia unit of its long-term care facility.

Officials at the Dayton VA Medical Center tell the Dayton Daily News that the project calls for modernizing the 40-bed unit with updated safety and technology features, and "quality-of-life" enhancements.

Hospital officials say the renovation is part of $84 million in upgrades already approved for federal funding.

The medical center provides medical care to more than 35,000 veterans a year at its campus, west of downtown Dayton.

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