WYSO

University of Dayton

The August 2013 installment of SOCHE TALKS features Dr. Joseph Watras with the University of Dayton's School of Education and Allied Professions speaking on the history of racial desegregation in Dayton schools.

The SOCHE Talks are a collaboration with the Southwest Ohio Council for Higher Education. In this monthly series we’ll hear from faculty and staff from areas colleges and universities on a wide variety of subjects. It's an effort to bring Miami Valley research and thinking into the public arena – a way to enlighten the world with local knowledge.

The University of Dayton has received a $2.5 million donation for biology faculty research from the estate of a former UD professor and alumnus.

The Dayton Daily News reports that Robert J. Schuellein notified the school in a 1998 letter that he was making the gift. Schuellein died in 2011 at the age of 91.

University officials say Schuellein graduated in 1944 with a degree in biology and returned to UD in the late 1950s to teach and help establish the graduate program in biology.

The University of Dayton says its high number of alcohol violations among students has more to do with aggressive enforcement than excessive drinking.

The Dayton Daily News reports that UD's more than 3,500 alcohol violations over a three-year period outpaced much larger Ohio schools.

The 8,000-student university's disciplinary referrals for drinking trailed only the much-larger Ohio State University among the state's colleges from 2009 to 2011, the period for which the latest data is available.

The 13th Dayton Jewish International Film Festival is now open and 8 films will screen at THE NEON. The line-up looks terrific!

The NCAA’s First Four tournament kick off today at the University of Dayton Arena.  The games will open with less fanfare than they did a year ago but there’s still plenty of excitement surrounding them.

Absent this year from the NCAA tournament kickoff is a presidential visit and the big Oregon District street party that began last year, but this year’s First Four event has been sold out since last October. The tournament opening has a significant economic impact for the Dayton area.

Following Sunday's early morning disturbance of more than a thousand people on the University of Dayton campus, administrators say they are looking into a wide range of sanctions against students who participated.

According to UD officials, early morning St. Patrick's Day festivities gave way to riot-like conditions when a gathering of more than a thousand students began climbing on cars, throwing bottles and yelling at police who were responding to a false fire alarm.

Administrators at the University of Dayton plan to meet this week to discuss an unruly weekend party in a student housing area that had to be quelled by riot-equipped police officers.

Media outlets report the pre-dawn St. Patrick's Day crowd of more than 1,000 people was climbing on cars, throwing bottles and yelling at police early Sunday morning.

WHIO-TV reports 11 vehicles were damaged, including a police cruiser after the disturbance.

The University of Dayton is unveiling their new RiverMobile, a mobile learning studio that puts the region's five rivers on 18 wheels. 

RiverMobile is a traveling exhibit converted from a semi-trailer that highlights one of our greatest local resources, the Great Miami River watershed.  the mobile unit was built by students in the University's Rivers Institute, and local donors provided a lot of support for the project. It's being unveiled this morning as part of the sixth-annual River Summit at the University of Dayton River Campus. 

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for January 27, 2013 including the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney speaks with Jason Antonick from the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce about new business filings in the Miami Valley.

-PoliticsOhio: What Air Force Cuts Mean For Miami Valley, by Emily McCord

Court statistics show the number of bankruptcy filings in Ohio last year fell to the lowest total since 2006. 

The Akron Beacon Journal reports experts point to several reasons for the drop, including mortgage lenders holding off foreclosure proceedings and people having so much financial trouble that they have no assets left to protect.

University of Dayton professor Jeffrey Morris, who's a member of the National Bankruptcy Conference, says increased awareness about the struggling economy also may make people more cautious financially.

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