Unemployment

The state says Ohio's unemployment rate held steady in July at 7.2 percent, matching what it was a year ago and remaining slightly higher than earlier in 2013. 

Ohio's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has varied only slightly since the beginning of the year. It has hovered below the U.S. unemployment rate, which dropped slightly to 7.4 percent for July.

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services says Ohio had 416,000 unemployed workers last month, up about 3,000 from June.

The state is changing the signs on its unemployment centers and putting in a new requirement for Ohioans who are out of work – that number is now at 413,000.

The new effort requires the state’s county unemployment centers to be branded under a single identity. Dave Reines is the executive director of Employment Connections, which will soon become Ohio Means Jobs Cuyahoga County.

“It seems to me that the, there’s some benefit to have some consistency across the state,” says Reines.

Ohio's unemployment rate for April was 7.0 percent - down slightly from 7.1 percent in the two previous months.

State officials released the numbers this morning ahead of the newest statewide labor force data.

The rate has consistently remained below the national level. The U.S. unemployment rate for April was 7.5 percent.

The state's leaders have said Ohio's economy and its job market are getting stronger, though the process is slow.

The state's declining unemployment rate will soon trigger a decrease in the amount of federal unemployment compensation available to Ohioans.

The number of weeks of unemployment compensation available depends on the state's unemployment rate, which averaged less than 7 percent in September, October and November. That means the maximum amount of compensation available, including state unemployment compensation, will drop from 63 weeks to 54 weeks on Jan. 12

The oil and gas boom has brought in lots of activity to eastern Ohio, and perhaps lots of out of state workers. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports says that’s a problem for the governor.

Gov. John Kasich has joked several times about the people he wants to see working with the oil and gas industry in Ohio, including in his State of the State speech in February.

Ohio food banks are distributing more food these days than during the recession a few years ago.

The Ohio Association of Foodbanks says a difficult employment climate and increased costs for daily necessities are to blame.

The association says state food banks distributed 45 percent more food and supplies in fiscal year 2012 than they did just three years earlier at the height of the recession.

Flickr Creative Commons user EmmyMik

Sinclair Community College is slated to get a nearly $12 million federal grant for the development of job training in information technology.

Sinclair  will receive the funding to lead a consortium to develop the training. The U.S. Department of Labor says the money is part of $500 million in grants announced through a program that promotes skill development and jobs in certain fields through partnerships between employers and training providers.

Ohio is facing a catch-22. Because the state's official unemployment rate has dropped to a full percentage point below the national average, the federal government is cutting back its share of emergency unemployment benefits to jobless Ohioans.

Ben Johnson, with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, says people will notice the cutback at the beginning of December.

 

A recent survey conducted by MadeInDaytonBlog.Com indicates that many manufacturing jobs in the Dayton area remain unfilled, despite large numbers of people looking for work.

The blog was started back in December as a clearinghouse for local manufacturers to communicate needs and exchange ideas.  More than a hundred companies responded to the survey and said they have jobs that have remained unfilled – and many say the disconnect between available jobs and the unemployed comes down to skills. 

DAYTON- Ohio’s unemployment rate continues to drop, indicating economic improvement in the state. Figures from the United States Bureau of Labor statistics show that the state has seen an overall 1 percent decrease in jobless Ohioans from September to February.  However, local rates in the Dayton Metropolitan area are still high. 

Dayton’s jobless rate in October was at 9.3 then fell to 8.3 percent in November.  It has been rising since then and now stands at 8.8 percent for January.  Figures for February and March are not yet released for the City.

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