WYSO

Transportation

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American Airlines says it has quote "stabilized" a computer system that failed at its Dayton-based affiliate carrier, causing the cancellation of 2,500 flights over the past week.

 The failure occurred in computers used to schedule crews for Dayton’s PSA Airlines, which is owned by American and operates many American Eagle regional flights.

A spokesperson said PSA stabilized the computer systems Tuesday morning, but that there would be some additional cancellations Wednesday as the airline repositioned planes and crews.

A pallet of Pampers at the Dayton Mixing Center.
Marci Rhodes / Procter & Gamble

Ohio is located within one day’s drive of more than half the country’s population. This fact is often touted by development officials looking to boost the state’s economic profile.

It’s also a favorite talking point among many Miami Valley business leaders, who say the proximity to interstate highways gives Dayton an edge in attracting new investment.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Dayton chapter of the NAACP has launched an effort to remove the City of Dayton's recently reactivated traffic cameras.

Group members allege the cameras unfairly target vulnerable communities in the Miami Valley.

The organization is aiming to collect 5,000 signatures on a petition to put the issue on the November ballot.

NAACP President Derrick Foward says the cameras disproportionately affect poor residents.

Dayton City Commissioners Wednesday voted to approve an ordinance banning panhandling along several busy roadways within city limits
April Laissle / WYSO

Dayton City Commissioners unanimously passed an ordinance effectively banning panhandling along many major roadways in Dayton. 

The new law prohibits pedestrians from coming within three feet of an operating vehicle on 51 busy roadways in the city. It would also penalize motorists who slow down or deviate from traffic lanes to interact with pedestrians.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The City of Dayton is activating traffic cameras at two more sites Monday. A total of five intersections within city limits are now camera monitored.

Red-light cameras have officially been activated at the intersections of James H. McGee Blvd and Third Street and Linden Avenue and Smithville Rd. Violators will be issued warnings for the first 30 days after activation. After that, $85 citations will be issued by mail.

Speed cameras are already operating at three other city intersections:

Clifton "Sonny" Montgomery recently reinstated his suspended driver's license with the help of a specialized Dayton legal clinic.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A Cleveland investigation last year found driver's license suspensions disproportionately affect Ohio’s poorest communities.

Bureau of Motor Vehicles data collected by WYSO show the number of driver's license suspensions is on the rise in Montgomery County. Many are for non-driving related offenses.

Dayton's officials are coming up against some unknowns in the budget process for next year.
Derek Jensen / Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Dayton is again exploring ways to ban panhandling along major city highways. At a meeting Wednesday evening, the city commission is expected to review an ordinance that would criminalize the practice.

Dayton first introduced legislation to restrict panhandling in 2011. That law required panhandlers to register with the city, and restricted begging to daylight hours. It also allowed cops to arrest violators instead of just citing them.

After legal challenges, the law was partially repealed in 2016.

School buses line up at Centerville department of education transportation headquarters.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton school bus drivers have approved a contract deal with Dayton Public Schools, preventing a strike that was originally scheduled to begin Tuesday.

Details of that deal have not yet been released. But, according to a statement from the district, members of the Local 627 chapter of the OAPSE voted overwhelmingly in favor of the new contract. The school board is set to officially approve the deal at a scheduled board meeting Tuesday.

The two parties announced they had reached an impasse late last month, after more than nine months of negotiations.

school transportation bus buses DPS public schools transit children kids education
Ohio Department of Transportation Facebook page

Dayton Public Schools and the union representing district bus drivers have reached a tentative agreement to avoid a strike, according to a statement from both parties.

The deal still needs to be approved by the school board and the union's full membership before it is finalized.

The two parties have been in negotiations for over 9 months. In that time, they’ve reached tentative agreements that were eventually voted down by members of the bus drivers union. Bus Drivers are scheduled to strike on Tuesday, April 10 if a final contract deal is not ratified.

School buses line up at Centerville department of education transportation headquarters.
Jess Mador / WYSO

With less than a week to go before a planned bus driver strike, Dayton Public School officials have yet to release details of a backup student-transportation plan.

The Local 627 chapter of the OAPSE bus drivers’ union announced plans to strike last week, after contract talks with the district broke down. DPS officials say there are no plans to continue negotiations with the union before the April 10 strike date.

To learn more about how the impending driver strike could impact DPS parents and students, WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with WYSO education reporter April Laissle.

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