Taxes

Sherrod Brown
WCPN

Ohio’s Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown is grinding the ax of tax reform in advance of Tuesday’s State of the Union address. Brown wants to expand the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) under a proposal he’s calling the “Working Families Tax Relief Act.”

money
401kcalculator.org/Flickr/Creative Commons

A national report by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy ranks Ohio 18th in the country for most imbalanced tax systems. In a “regressive” tax system, low- and middle-income people pay a larger balance of their incomes in state and local taxes than high earners. The study finds very few states with “progressive” tax systems, and ranks Washington, Florida, Texas, South Dakota and Illinois as the top five for regressive systems.

City of Springfield

  A tax reform bill passed in the Ohio statehouse Wednesday has lots of city and town leaders riled up. The bill, HB 5, set out to reform local income taxes by adding some uniform regulations, including changing the system for companies that work in multiple municipalities. Right now, municipal income taxes are a patchwork, with different policies in over 600 municipalities around the state.

Columbus Area Agency Fails To Make Nationwide Loan Payments

Oct 17, 2014
Mike Small / Flickr Creative Commons

The complex deal to use casino-tax money to buy Nationwide Arena has hit a snag: there’s not enough money to make loan payments. Officials expected to pay off the loans with taxes from the new Columbus casino. But casino tax revenues are below projections. The city and county have not made a single loan payment for the arena.

A little history

To keep the Blue Jackets from leaving town, the Franklin County Convention Facilities Authority bought Nationwide Arena and gave the team free rent.

Chris Potter / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio’s looking at an $800 million surplus at the end of its fiscal year, and Republican Governor John Kasich has been touting $400 million in tax cuts in the latest mid-term budget, known as the mid-biennium review.

A new study shows Ohio’s property taxes have been shifting from business to residential and agricultural for 35 years, a shift that’s accelerated over the last 20 years.

GM's Moraine assembly was once an iconic Dayton-area employer. A Chinese auto-glass company will soon take over the building, but the city of Moraine is still short thousands of jobs.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A few income tax increases and levies for operating expenses went before Miami Valley voters in yesterday’s primary election, and preliminary results show voters largely said yes to raising municipal taxes.

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton voters will be asked to renew a .5 percent increase to the city’s income tax on Tuesday’s primary ballot.

Dayton’s income tax is currently 2.25 percent, but the permanent rate is 1.75 percent—the last half a percent has always been temporary. Voters have renewed it overwhelmingly four times since it was first passed in 1984.

City officials hope to cut the costs of bringing the tax to a vote in the future by asking voters to pass the increase with no time limit.

A photo of a 1927 advertisement for the city of Moraine posted in city hall; in addition to being an early industrial site in Dayton, David Hicks says it was considered a riverside getaway for Dayton residents.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The city of Moraine has an income tax levy coming up on the May 6, 2014 ballot that would increase the tax from 2 percent to 2.5 percent for a period of five and a half years. The city’s revenue, which has always depended on an income tax, has been in a steep decline since at least the year 2000, as many large employers left the south Dayton suburb.

Protesters in downtown Dayton wore Robin Hood hats.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A group of protesters gathered in front of Ohio Congressman Mike Turner’s Dayton office Friday to call for the passage of a so-called “Robin Hood tax.” The demonstration is one of several across the country timed with the anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination in 1968.

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