Supreme Court

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The Supreme Court has ruled Arizona can allow an independent commission created there to oversee the drawing of congressional district lines. The ruling could means changes to Ohio's districts. 

Common Cause Ohio leader Sam Gresham says he expected the court to rule in favor of Arizona’s proposed redistricting plan.

“It was just a delaying tactic on the part of people. There’s nothing in there that prevents it,” Gresham said.

Ohio's Amish County Reacts To Marriage Ruling By Supreme Court

Jun 30, 2015
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Back in 2004, a majority of voters in all but one county in Ohio passed a state constitutional amendment banning gay marriage. But some were far more adamant than others. In largely rural, heavily Amish Holmes County, the amendment passed by better than three-to-one, which was one of the widest margins in the state. Some weren't happy with last week's ruling by the Supreme Court allowing same-sex marriage. 

Stig Andersen / Flickr Creative Commons

Same-sex marriage is now legal in all 50 states after the U.S. Supreme Court released its 5-4 ruling today. The decision was prompted by lawsuits in several states challenging bans on same sex marriage.

Rich Incorvati with Equality Springfield says it’s a big deal, especially for LGBT communities in Ohio.

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Affordable Care Act

Jun 25, 2015
Wikipedia

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court has upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

The justices said in a 6-3 ruling Thursday that the subsidies that 8.7 million people currently receive to make insurance affordable do not depend on where they live, under the 2010 health care law. About 160,000 Ohioans will continue getting subsidies to pay for the federally-mandated health insurance. 

Obergefell Optimistic About Same-Sex Marriage Ruling

Jun 22, 2015

The U.S Supreme Court could soon release a decision that could result in one of the biggest steps toward LGBT rights in American history.

Jim Obergefell of Cincinnati married John Arthur, his partner of 20 years, before Arthur passed away in 2013. Obergefell is fighting to have his name listed on the death certificate of his partner of more than 20 years. He says being so close to a final ruling has caused nerves to set in. 

Protesters took to the streets in Cincinnati in 2008 demanding gay marriage rights.
Jere Keys / Flickr/Creative Commons

The Ohio and Michigan Democratic parties have come together to file a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court on a gay marriage case it is considering. Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper says the parties want the nation’s highest court to overturn an appeals court decision that upholds bans on same sex marriage in Ohio, Michigan, Tennessee and Kentucky.

The Human Rights Campaign marches at Columbus gay pride in 2007.
F. Tronchin / Flickr/Creative Commons

Following the Supreme Court’s announcement that it will weigh in on the issue of gay marriage, the group Why Marriage Matters Ohio (WMMO) issued a statement hailing the decision.   

User Stéfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

  The U.S. Supreme Court's has rejected appeals from five states seeking to prohibit same-sex marriage, but the fight isn’t over in Ohio.

The Supreme Court’s decision to turn away appeals from Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin means 60 percent of the U.S. population lives in a state where same-sex marriages will be recognized. Ohio still isn’t one of them, but Al Gerhardstein, who’s the attorney in two cases filed against Ohio’s same-sex marriage ban, says he thinks change is inevitable.

The Supreme Courts decision on President Obama's Affordable Care act has already received mixed reaction across the country, and as WYSO's Emily McCord reports, there's still argument on what this will mean for Ohio.