State Budget

Wright State University

Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, John Carey, was at Wright State University on Monday for the final stop on a statewide tour to highlight the recent state budget and its impact on higher education.

Carey, a former state representative appointed to the Board of Regents in April, said the mission mandated to him by Governor John Kasich is to align Ohio educational institutions with workforce development.

Ed Fitzgerald (left) has had a difficult campaign for governor, and has fallen far behind incumbent John Kasich in the polls.
Emily McCord / WYSO

The Democrat challenging Governor John Kasich is taking his message on the road. As WYSO’s Emily McCord reports Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald was in Dayton Wednesday to talk about women’s issues and the state budget.

How the State Budget Affects Education

Jul 11, 2013

The state budget Governor Kasich signed last week puts more than 19 billion dollars of state funding into Ohio schools. State GOP leaders are calling it a historic investment in education.

Overall, most schools will see more money from the state than they did last year, nearly $1 billion more. But not every district will get more money—about a third of districts won’t see any increase. And even this new money will not make up for the deep cuts in state funding for schools in 2009.

Governor Kasich signed the state budget late Sunday night, and within it, several laws that restrict abortion access. Emily McCord speaks to Ohio Public Radio's Jo Ingles about what the law says and what it could mean for Ohio women. Ingles reports that it's becoming more common for controversial issues to slip into state budgets to avoid public debate.

Ohio’s budget was a big victory for Ohio Right to Life as five bills it supported were attached to the state’s new two year fiscal plan. But NARAL Pro Choice Ohio says the fight isn’t over.

Ohio Right to Life President Mike Gonadakis is pretty pleased now that Republican Governor John Kasich has signed a budget that includes five anti abortion amendments.

Karen Kasler, Ohio Public Radio

After months of discussion and debate and several days of lingering questions, the state has a new two-year, $62 billion budget. The signing came with just hours to go before the new fiscal year.

The budget includes a gradual income tax cut over three years for everyone, a 50 percent income tax cut for small businesses, an increase in the state sales tax along with an expansion to digital downloads and magazine subscriptions, and some property tax changes. Gov. John Kasich said he was pleased with it, though it didn’t include his proposed Medicaid expansion.

Gov. John Kasich has vetoed a piece of the two-year budget that would bar the state's Medicaid program from covering the additional low-income residents allowed under the Affordable Care Act.

The Republican governor also vetoed 21 other provision in signing off on the $62 billion spending plan Sunday night.

Kasich's proposed budget had initially called for expanding Medicaid. But GOP leaders stripped the idea from the House version of the state spending plan in April. The House went even further, inserting a provision blocking the expansion.

After several long months and a very long day, the state budget is nearly finished. It includes income tax cuts of 8.5% the first year, 9% the second and 10% the third, with a 50% cut for small businesses, along with an increase in the state sales tax to 5.75% and some property tax changes. Republican Ron Amstutz chaired the conference committee.

“This is a very good package that’s being recommended to you,” said Amstutz.

A Republican-dominated legislative panel has passed a slew of changes to Ohio's budget, including a last-minute abortion regulation requiring doctors to provide written notice to pregnant women of a detectable fetal heartbeat.

The six-member conference committee moved the spending bill along party lines Tuesday night. The 4-2 vote sends the finalized budget bill to the floors of both legislative chambers, which are likely to take action Thursday.

Lawmakers face a Sunday deadline to pass the almost $62 billion, two-year spending bill.

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