WYSO

Springfield

OEPA Hearing On Mining Company Permit Draws Crowd, Comments

Feb 2, 2018
Many Clark County residents at the hearing were worried about the impact Enon Sand and Gravel's proposal could have on the environment.
Kristin Stratman / WYSO

More than 200 Springfield residents packed into a cafeteria at Greenon High School for a public hearing Thursday night.

Many came to comment on an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency permit application that would allow mining company Enon Sand and Gravel to dump treated wastewater into a tributary of the nearby Mud Run.

Dina Pierce is spokesperson for the Ohio EPA. Pierce says the agency is listening to community concerns as it considers the permit application.

Citizens Against Mining is fighting a proposed Clark County mining project
Citizens Against Mining, Mad River Township, Ohio. / WYSO

Organizers are hoping for crowds at an upcoming environmental hearing Thursday in Springfield.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency will collect public feedback at the hearing on a proposal to discharge wastewater into a Clark County waterway.

 

The Ohio EPA is considering mining company Enon Sand and Gravel’s proposal to send thousands of gallons of wastewater from a limestone quarry into a Mud Run tributary.

 

Salvation Army

The Springfield Salvation Army is looking for dodgeball teams to help raise money for at-risk youth.

 

The ninth annual fundraising tournament will be held in March.

 

Ryan Ray is development director for the Salvation Army.  He says the tournament's mission is to reassure neighborhood young people of their worth.

 

The Springfield Police Department is hiring to fill an officer shortage with funding from a recent temporary tax increase.
Springfield Police Division Facebook page

The Springfield Police Department has been understaffed for months. But thanks to a temporary tax hike approved by voters earlier this year, the department is again accepting applications. Police officials say the new officers will go a long way toward responding to the city’s ongoing overdose crisis.

Geraldine Moore reminisces over old newspaper clippings she saved detailing Davey's fights.
Bill Franz, Dayton at Work and Play

In Springfield, Ohio, in a public green space just south of downtown, stands an 8-foot-tall bronze statue commemorating the life and death of a young boxer. His hands raised, ready to fight. He was once welcomed by throngs of cheering fans, and handed a key to the city. 

In this town, he’s a hero. Community Voices Producer Leo DeLuca has a story about Davey “The Springfield Rifle” Moore.

This year marks the fourth annual Springfield Rotary Gourmet Food Truck Competition.  Ross McGregor joined Niki Dakota live in the studio on Excursions to talk about the growing event, Rotary's mission and more.

The 2017 Springfield Rotary Gourmet Food Truck Competition is Saturday, August 12th at Veteran's Park. 

Springfield Brewery Rises to the Top

Jan 19, 2017
Buck Gunn / Hatch New Media

Springfield’s downtown revitalization efforts got a big boost recently when the city’s first craft brewery, Mother Stewart’s, was named one of the top new breweries in the nation by Beer Advocate Magazine. Brewmaster Kevin Loftis says the designation will help them expand their business.

Dan Gummel

Downtown Springfield has seen a flurry of development in the last year, with new small businesses, luxury lofts and a brewery all opening their doors.

One of the most high-profile new developments is Hatch Artist Studios, where a $500,000 renovation is transforming the long-vacant Metallic Casket Company complex into studios for artists and small business owners.

Springfield artist and Turner Foundation creative director Rod Hatfield says the complex was chosen for renovation because of its central downtown location and its significance to the city.

At a long meeting Tuesday night, Springfield’s City Commission voted to move forward with a budget that includes cuts to city services following the failure of an income tax levy in November. 

The $800,000 in cuts will affect the city’s municipal courts and parks and recreation department. Money set aside to pay police officers and firefighters for overtime will also be reduced. And, the city says it will close both a fire station and a police substation to further cut costs.

Numbers show Clark County has seen job growth in 2016, but it's unclear whether this positive economic outlook may be impacted by the city of Springfield’s ongoing budget troubles.

 

Recent Clark County investments include development at the Prime Ohio Industrial Park and Wall Street brokerage firm EF Hutton’s decision to relocate its global headquarters to downtown Springfield.

 

Pages