WYSO

Springfield

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear a city's challenge to new rules that require a police officer to be present when an automated camera is used to issue traffic tickets.

Springfield's argument against the law was rejected by a county judge last year and the city lost an appeal earlier this year. Nearby Dayton also has an appeal pending before the state's highest court.

Ryan Brooks / Flickr Creative Commons

Health officials say more than a dozen people have become sickened by a listeriosis outbreak connected to a Dole processing plant in southwest Ohio.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday that three more people have fallen ill, including two from Ohio and one from Missouri. Eighteen people in all have reported bacterial illnesses in nine states— one of whom from Michigan has since died.

Listeriosis is often found in raw vegetables and meats, along with some soft cheeses.

Itinerant Studio: A Big Gem in a Small City

Feb 19, 2016
Dan Gummel

Husband and wife team Tom Heaphey and Vicki Rulli own Itinerant Studio.  A production art company based out of a former dry goods warehouse in downtown Springfield Ohio just down the road from the Clark County Public Library on West Jefferson Street.  Itinerant Studio occupies a unique niche in the art world  creating large print photography on materials like wood, metal and plexiglass and selling to clients all around the world.   Community Voices producer Dan Gummel stopped by to hear the story.

kthompson84 / Flickr Creative Commons

Can online lists impact us in ways we don’t understand? Are there real world fallouts to being one of the “ten worst” or “ten best”? Community Voices producer Dan Gummel takes a closer look at clickbait.

We’ve all seen those online lists: “The Top Ten Unhappiest Cities in The U.S.” or “The Ten Most Miserable Places to Live in 2015”. Here in the WYSO listening area several cities including Cincinnati, Dayton and Springfield have been named to lists claiming they are unhappy, or dying. But are these lists really accurate?

 

Dan Gummel / WYSO

This summer Project Jericho, a non-profit housed at Clark State in Springfield, hosted a free arts camp for local youth. They hired professional artists from around the country to teach.

Students have a chance to get help with school through the outreach program. hispanic springfield latino
Scott Marshall / Springfield City Schools

Most recently on Graduating Latino, we visited Trotwood-Madison schools to learn about challenges for Latino students. Now we head to Clark County, where the number of kids identified as Hispanic doubled from 2002 to 2012. The Springfield City School District is reaching outside of the classroom to help families succeed.

Clark County Tourism Industry Growing

Jul 25, 2014
Wayne Baker / WYSO

Clark County is seeing its tourism industry grow according to a recently released economic report. The study done by Oxford Economics reveals that tourism contributes almost $368 million per year to the county's economy.

Chris Schutte, of the Greater Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau, released the findings of the study which shows an increase of $42 million since 2011. He feels there are a few key factors involved with the financial improvement.

Immigration reform might be dead in Washington for now, but some local advocates are still on the case. One of those is long-time conservative activist and teacher Carl Ruby. He’s part of a new initiative called Welcome Springfield—a takeoff on Welcome Dayton—to work on making Springfield a more appealing place for immigrants.

Officials concerned about the growing population of cats roaming an area state park say they're trying to crack down on people illegally feeding animals or abandoning their pets there.

The Springfield News-Sun reports officials have stepped up patrols and posted signs warning visitors not to feed animals at Buck Creek State Park.

The local humane society's director says food left out can attract animals that pose more danger, such as coyotes.

A park law enforcement official says cutting off the improper food supply will help persuade the animals to move on.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Click here for the extended story on American Public Media's Marketplace.

The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to make a decision soon about where to open up air space for the testing of commercial drones. Southwest Ohio is competing to become one of six sites around the country as the FAA prepares to regulate the commercial drone industry by late 2015.

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