Senator Rob Portman

StatehouseNews

Incumbent Republican Senator Rob Portman has defeated former Ohio Governor Ted Strickland.

Portman was first elected to the Senate in 2010. He ran a strong campaign tying his opponent to Ohio's sinking economy during Strickland's governorship, which coincided with the national recession.

Portman kept Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at a distance leading up to today's election. Portman didn't campaign with Trump and withdrew his endorsement when a 2005 tape of Trump making lewd comments about kissing and groping women surfaced last month.

Ken "kcdsTM" / Flickr

Gun regulation is an issue has been a challenging one for both major party candidates in the US Senate race between incumbent Republican Sen. Rob Portman and Democratic former Gov. Ted Strickland. In the last installment of a three part series, the Statehouse News Bureau is breaking down the race issue-by-issue. Correspondent Karen Kasler examines the candidates’ somewhat complicated positions on guns.

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Keith Cooper / Flickr Creative Commons

Trade has been a top issue in the ads and debates in this US Senate race. And it’s somewhat ironic that Portman’s view on trade is closer to that of Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, and Strickland’s view is more like Republican nominee Donald Trump. Portman is the former U.S. Trade Representative under former President George W. Bush, and when he was in Congress, he voted for the big trade deal for many watching this race, the North American Free Trade Agreement or NAFTA.

Portman, Strickland Offer Differing Options on Immigration

Oct 31, 2016
U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio); former Gov. Ted Strickland (D-Ohio)
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Two longtime Ohio politicians are duking it out for your vote in the race for U.S. Senate. Republican Senator Rob Portman has held the office since 2011 but Democratic former Gov. Ted Strickland wants to take his place.

Andy Chow

A leading Democratic political action committee is canceling ad buys in the Ohio Senate race. It's the second major group to do so as Democrats increasingly appear to be losing hope of winning back the key state.

Former Ohio Governor, Ted Strickland
Wikimedia Commons

Pilloried by negative attacks and lagging in funding and some polls, ex-Gov. Ted Strickland is airing the first television ads of his campaign against U.S. Sen. Rob Portman.

The multi-million ad buy began airing across Ohio Wednesday. The 60-second spot focuses on Strickland's hard-scrabble childhood in Appalachian Ohio, his blue-collar roots and the campaign's working-class focus.

Press photo

Ohio Senator Rob Portman endorsed Donald Trump months ago, but he’s been pretty muted in his support. That changed on Thursday.

At a speech to the Ohio delegation breakfast at the Republican National Convention, Portman offered more full-throated support for Trump, and used his name more often than speakers at the rest of the week’s  breakfasts combined.

He says Republicans know how to fix the economy as evidenced by what’s happened in Ohio.

Karen Kasler

US Senator Rob Portman is facing a tough re-election fight this year – and some Ohio Republicans are worried that Donald Trump’s controversial candidacy may drag down Portman’s chances to beat Democratic former Governor Ted Strickland. The candidate popped in for a little campaigning on the first day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Both sides are turning up the heat in the general election campaign in Ohio's closely watched U.S. Senate race.

Former Democratic Gov. Ted Strickland easily won his three-way primary Tuesday to face Republican Sen. Rob Portman. He calls Portman a Beltway insider. It's a seat Democrats think they could take in their effort to regain a Senate majority. Polls have indicated Strickland and Portman turn toward fall about even.

Former Ohio Governor, Ted Strickland
Wikimedia Commons

A former Ohio governor has won the Democratic U.S. Senate nomination in Ohio for the Republican-held seat.

Ted Strickland handily held off a spirited challenge by Cincinnati councilman P.G. Sittenfeld, who argued that state Democrats needed fresh faces and ideas. Strickland had 69 percent of the vote to 20 percent for Sittenfeld and 10 percent for Cincinnati occupational therapist Kelli Prather with 7 percent of precincts reporting unofficial returns.

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