Secretary of State Jon Husted


Ohio's elections chief has rejected 1,000-plus signatures submitted by Democrats trying to get a repeal issue on the state's new congressional map on next year's ballot.

Secretary of State Jon Husted, a Republican, says the redistricting legislation laying out the new U.S. House districts contained an appropriation and took effect immediately, so it isn't subject to referendum.

Polling sites in 20 counties will get permanent upgrades to assist Ohio voters with disabilities under newly released federal grant money.

Secretary of State Jon Husted said Tuesday that about $100,000 in grants will go to county boards of elections to improve access for voters with disabilities.

The funds were made available by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through the Help America Vote Act.  Individual grant amounts range from $40 to $15,000 for improvements in 92 precincts.

The Ohio Apportionment Board has approved maps for state house and senate districts for the next decade. The lone Democrat on the board, House Minority Leader Armond Budish, says the maps are skewed to greatly favor Republicans and he says Democrats and the public were left out of the process.

"As part of what seems to be the common thread all year, the majority map was crafted under a shroud of secrecy with no public input and no input from the minority party," says Budish.

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Emily McCord speaks to Jo Ingles for this week's edition of PoliticsOhio. Secretary of State Jon Husted issued directives this week, telling local boards of elections they are not allowed to send out absentee voter request forms. This comes ahead of a newly passed election reform law that is not effective yet. But some Ohioans want to put that law up for a referendum on the ballot. Ingles reports that they're unhappy with Husted's directives, saying it suppresses the rights of voters, while Husted counters that it's only fair to keep county election rules uniform.

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COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ohio's elections chief says a liberal policy group has no legal grounds for challenging his certification of a fall ballot measure that seeks to exempt the state from provisions in the federal health care overhaul.

In a response filed Tuesday to ProgressOhio's lawsuit, Secretary of State Jon Husted says it's improper for the group to challenge the signatures submitted to get the measure on the ballot. He questioned the group's contention that extra information was included on petitions.


COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ohio voters opposed to a new collective bargaining law that limits public employee unions will get to vote "no" at the ballot box this fall, following a decision Wednesday by the state Ballot Board.

 The decision followed hours of negotiation by Secretary of State Jon Husted, the board's Republican chairman. It echoes years of Ohio ballot tradition, but also counts as a victory for the law's opponents. Voters against or confused by an issue tend to vote against it.

The group that wants to put the recently passed elections reform law on the statewide ballot will make another attempt to get petition language certified.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ohio's elections chief says the first of three statewide issues listed on the November ballot will be about whether to raise the age limit for judges.

Secretary of State Jon Husted says Issue 2 will be whether to keep Ohio's new law limiting collective bargaining rights for public workers. The third issue will let Ohioans vote on whether they want to participate in the national health care overhaul.

Ohioans will be able to vote this November on whether they want to participate in the national health care overhaul.

Secretary of State Jon Husted said Tuesday that opponents to the overhaul collected nearly 427,000 valid signatures to get a constitutional amendment on the ballot. The measure needed roughly 385,000 signatures.

At question is a proposed amendment to Ohio's Constitution to keep people from being required to buy health insurance or face penalties. The federal mandate would go into effect in 2014, when new competitive insurance exchanges are scheduled to open.

A new poll shows voters think it's ok to require Ohioans to show a photo ID when casting ballots.

In the latest Quinnipiac University poll, 93 percent of republicans, 77 percent of independents and 66 percent of Democrats said they'd support a law that requires voters to show photo id to vote. However, some lawmakers, including Ohio's Secretary of State Jon Husted, who support the bill don't like the way it was written and question its constitutionality.