Secretary of State Jon Husted

Democrats, along with President Obama’s re-election campaign, have filed a federal lawsuit against Ohio to try to reinstate the three days of early in person voting before Election day.

In 2008, 93 thousand Ohioans voted in Ohio in the three days before the election.  Since then, Republican lawmakers have wiped out the 3 day window for most Ohioans. Only military members and their families can now take advantage of that opportunity.  Ohio Democratic Party Chair Chris Redfern says that’s not right.

Ellen Belcher, who's filling in for Emily McCord, interviews Secretary of State Jon Husted, Ohio's chief elections officer and a former state lawmaker from Kettering.

There’s a problem commonly known as right church, wrong pew.  It’s when a voter goes to the right polling place but ends up casting a ballot in the wrong precinct. 

Emily McCord speaks to Ohio Public Radio's Jo Ingles in this edition of PoliticsOhio. Ingles reports that the fate of the election reform ballot issue has sparked controversy among Secretary of State Jon Husted and other members of the Republican Legislature. Ingles explains the alternative suggestions made by Democrats and discusses the future of election reform.

The campaign of 2011 is just a few hours away from its conclusion, and there have been few reports of voters who waited till today to cast ballots experiencing problems. While elections officials in several counties did report heavy turnout for early voting, Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted says that’s not necessarily an indication of a huge number of people coming to the polls in an off-year election.

A vote by Ohio's elections chief means no extra hours for early voting at the board of elections in Montgomery County.

Elections board members were tied on the question of extended early voting. The Dayton Daily News reports Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted became the tie breaker and sided with GOP board members who did not want to stretch the absentee voting into the weekend and evenings.

For this week's edition of PoliticsOhio, Emily McCord speaks with Ohio Public Radio Statehouse News Bureau's Jo Ingles who reported earlier this week that a new political action committee was being formed to help pass the bill that would ban abortions at the point a fetus’s heartbeat can be detected. But she says stricter limits on abortion are also being considered by this group, including a drive that would protect a fetus under the Ohio consitution.

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Ohio's elections chief has rejected 1,000-plus signatures submitted by Democrats trying to get a repeal issue on the state's new congressional map on next year's ballot.

Secretary of State Jon Husted, a Republican, says the redistricting legislation laying out the new U.S. House districts contained an appropriation and took effect immediately, so it isn't subject to referendum.

Polling sites in 20 counties will get permanent upgrades to assist Ohio voters with disabilities under newly released federal grant money.

Secretary of State Jon Husted said Tuesday that about $100,000 in grants will go to county boards of elections to improve access for voters with disabilities.

The funds were made available by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through the Help America Vote Act.  Individual grant amounts range from $40 to $15,000 for improvements in 92 precincts.

The Ohio Apportionment Board has approved maps for state house and senate districts for the next decade. The lone Democrat on the board, House Minority Leader Armond Budish, says the maps are skewed to greatly favor Republicans and he says Democrats and the public were left out of the process.

"As part of what seems to be the common thread all year, the majority map was crafted under a shroud of secrecy with no public input and no input from the minority party," says Budish.

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