School Funding

Majority Republicans in the Ohio Senate say their state budget education proposal spreads more money to more school districts.

Senate President Keith Faber says the plan increases state aid to schools in the two-year budget by more than $717 million compared to the current budget, which ends June 30.

Faber said Thursday the money stems from expected adjustments to state revenue and Medicaid caseload projections.

The GOP-controlled Senate's proposal spends almost $142 million more to fund schools compared to the House-passed version of the spending bill.

Springfield City School administrators have had time to digest the school funding plan released by Ohio House Republicans. Under the House plan, schools will receive nearly $121 million less next year than in Governor John Kasich's plan. Springfield City Schools fare well under the House plan.

In their school funding budget, House Republicans increased per-pupil funding in Ohio from $5,000 in Kasich’s plan to $5,732 in 2014, which is the same amount that has been in place since 2009.

Ohio Public Radio

The Republicans in the legislature dealt several blows to Governor Kasich yesterday, including major revisions in his school funding formula. StateImpact Ohio’s Ida Lieszkovszky has this report on what those changes could mean for Ohio’s schools.

When Governor John Kasich announced his new school-funding proposal, most superintendents around the state were relieved to hear no one would get a funding cut. And there was also a lot of cheering when Kasich said his new formula would mean rich schools got less and poor schools got more.

Last week, Governor Kasich unveiled his new school funding formula with a lot of fanfare but few details on what it would actually mean for districts. Now, districts are finding just how much they would get under the new formula. StateImpact Ohio’s Ida Lieszkovszky reports some people are surprised by the numbers.

Governor Kasich is set to reveal his plans to overhaul school funding in the state.  There’s very little known about details but as Emily McCord reports for WYSO, it’s likely that digital education will be component.

Governor Kasich has signed a bill into law that grades schools on an A through F grading scale, which is a part of a bigger education plan that the Governor intends to release soon.

Ohio Governor John Kasich says Ohioans can expect to see his plan for improving education in Ohio’s k through 12 schools by the end of this month.  He says he and his staff have been working on it for months.  And Kasich says he’s glad details of it are not being released to the press.

The state says Ohio schools are getting nearly $38 million in the first chunk of casino-tax revenue.

This is the first distribution to schools since casinos opened last year. The money is distributed on a per-pupil basis twice per year to more than 1,000 school districts and charter schools across Ohio. It works out to $20.93 for each of the roughly 1.8 million students.

The breakdown was announced Tuesday but the Ohio Department of Taxation. Schools receive 34 percent of the revenue, with 51 percent going to county government.

Legislative analysts say Ohio could replace all the property tax money that's going to school districts through a hike in the state sales tax.

But to raise the more than $9.9 billion that's needed, policymakers would need to more than double the sales tax rate - from 5.5 cents on the dollar to 13.2 cents.  That's in part because the higher the tax goes the less consumers like to spend.

The Ohio Legislative Service Commission provided the estimate Wednesday to an Ohio House subcommittee that's studying school funding ideas.

Ohio Public Radio's Karen Kasler joins Emily McCord for this week's PoliticsOhio. She details the House plan to get rid of the estate tax and what impact that will have on local governments, and their changes to school funding.

Emily McCord speaks with Ohio Public Radio's Jo Ingles for this week's PoliticsOhio. Democrats say the Governor's office isn't providing them with information they need on school funding cuts. The Governor says it's available. Ingles and McCord discuss the discrepancy.