Richard Biehl

Dayton police say response times depend on call volume and the priority level of the call.  dayton police car
Carey Scheer / WYSO

Late last year, a man was assaulted by two people after walking out of the Family Dollar on Patterson road in Dayton. His attackers left pretty quickly, and the staff at family dollar called 911.  

 

“We kept calling them and calling them, hoping they would come faster,” says Jennifer, the store manager. “He could have had a concussion. He could have passed out. He was bleeding too.”

The victim also called 911. He told the operator that someone tried to kill him but initially he said he did not need an ambulance.

Dayton’s plan to use aerial surveillance to address crime in the city has been shelved. City manager Tim Riordan says it will not pursue a $120 thousand contract with Persistant Surveillance Systems Inc., a company that would have provided manned aircraft to monitor crime above the city. Riordan made his remarks at Wednesday's commission meeting.

In a press release to WYSO, Tim Riordan says:

The Dayton City Commission is considering a contract with a company that provides aerial surveillance for the city to monitor crime. It’s created controversy with civil rights groups and local citizens who say this is potential violation of privacy. Emily McCord speaks to Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl about the technology and its implications.