Rediscovered Radio

Honoring the Ancestors: Bing’s Birthday Card

Jun 29, 2014
Jocelyn Robinson / WYSO

We see the work of Dayton artist Willis “Bing” Davis hanging in banks, boardrooms, libraries, and concert halls throughout the Miami Valley. His art is full of color and movement, and is based on themes he’s been exploring for decades.

Archives Fellow Jocelyn Robinson found a 1981 interview with Bing Davis in the archives here at WYSO. And to celebrate the artist’s 76th birthday she some of the original recording and brings us up to date with the artist’s signature series.

Remembering Maya Angelou

Jun 12, 2014

Last Saturday, family and friends gathered in Winston-Salem, North Carolina to say good-bye to Maya Angelou, who died last month at the age of 86. Rediscovered Radio's Jocelyn Robinson adds our remembrance today with an interview from the WYSO archives, recorded in 1975.

Remembering What Happened At Jackson State College In 1970

May 15, 2014

In the spring of 1970, college campuses across the nation erupted in protests, mainly against the escalation of the war in Vietnam. We remember May 4th, the day Ohio National Guardsmen opened fire on demonstrators at Kent State University, killing four students and wounding nine. Only ten days later, another campus shooting left two dead and a dozen injured at a historically black college in Mississippi, but that event is not part of our collective consciousness.

United Farm Workers Week, 40 Years Later

May 2, 2014
César Chávez
Cornelius M. Keyes / National Archives

In the summer of 1973, César Chávez came to Dayton from the strike lines in Coachella, California to talk about the plight of farm workers. There was a week of activities and WYSO News was right in the middle of it.  Rediscovered Radio’s Jocelyn Robinson takes a look at the struggles facing the migrant worker community, then and now.

When United Farm Workers union organizer César Chávez spoke at the University of Dayton over forty years ago, the hardships he described sounded real, but seemed far away.

National Afro-American Museum

The National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce opened its doors 26 years ago this April. Rediscovered Radio’s Jocelyn Robinson found historic audio in the WYSO Archives, and offers a look at how the museum has fared over the years.

Back in the fall of 1980, WYSO News aired a story on the National Afro-American Museum project. Even then, according to reporter Brian McCormick, the museum had been in the works for a long time:

Arthur Morgan’s Simple Yet Elegant Solution

Mar 28, 2014
Arthur Morgan seated at his desk at the offices of the Miami Conservancy District on Monument Ave, Dayton, OH.
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

101 years ago this week, it rained in Dayton. And rained some more. And it kept on raining. It was the Great Dayton Flood. Today though, because of a man named Arthur E. Morgan, communities from Piqua to Hamilton have little to fear from the rising floodwaters of the Great Miami River. 

courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

The controversy began in 1960 at the Gegner Barber Shop located in Yellow Springs, Ohio. The owner, Lewis Gegner, claimed “I don’t know how to cut their (Negro’s) hair” and refused to provide service to African Americans.

By 1960, the Antioch Committee for Racial Equality (ACRE) and the Antioch Chapter of the NAACP were successful in desegregating other businesses in the Village of Yellow Springs. But Gegner refused even after being fined for violating the local anti-discrimination ordinance.

Rediscovered Radio: Historic Audio from the WYSO Archives

Feb 28, 2014
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

Five years ago, here at WYSO, we found a room full of old and dusty audio tapes in a moldy basement room. They contained programs going back to WYSO’s first broadcast in 1958.

With a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and help from the Greene County Public Library, we began to catalog and digitize more than 200 hours of those tapes, and today we begin to share them with you.

All this year we’ll focus on the 60s and 70s – to show how we lived and how the country was changing.