Rediscovered Radio

Susan Sontag: A Cool Cultural Icon Visits Antioch

Oct 1, 2016
Juan Bastos / via wikimedia commons

In the spring of 1965, Antioch College presented a lecture series on “The Shape of Things to Come in America.” Civil rights, avant-garde music, and computers were just a few of the topics.

Writer and social critic Susan Sontag was one of the speakers. In the decades after this lecture, her books and essays would come to influence how we think about photographic images, pop culture, and illness.

By Chip.berlet (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (], via Wikimedia Commons

In 1962 an Ohio State student, a singer and guitarist named Phil Ochs, moved to New York City and was soon at the center of the booming folk music scene in Greenwich Village which included Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Peter Paul and Mary. Today Phil Ochs' music is less well known than some of his colleagues'—but it still delivers a powerful message.

Schedule of events for the April 1965 Vietnam Colloquium at Antioch College
courtesy of Antiochiana

In 1965, as increasing numbers of American troops were sent to Vietnam, and an American bombing campaign grew, public forums were organized on college campuses across the country. They were known as “teach-ins”   The idea was to study the war and the draft in depth.  In April of 1965, the Vietnam Colloquium, was held over three days on the Yellow Springs campus of Antioch College.

Courtesy of Diana Tomas

Rediscovered Radio returns to the Viet Nam war period – when a Yellow Springs resident, inspired by his Quaker beliefs, took part in a dramatic war protest. The Quaker community he was a part of continues a tradition of active pacifism.

Forty nine years ago this spring, the war in Viet Nam was escalating. Nearly half a million American troops were in South Viet Nam at the time, supporting the government in its war with the North.

courtesy of VVAW

On the last installment of Rediscovered Radio, we heard from Barry Romo, who spoke at Antioch College in 1973 as a member of Vietnam Veterans Against the War. But Romo wasn’t always against the war. He volunteered for the Army out of high school, became an officer, led men in battle, and earned a Bronze Star for valor. In short, Romo was a model solider, so when he spoke out against the war, people paid attention.

This is the story of Romo’s second wartime trip to Vietnam, when he went back as a civilian.

Going Back to Vietnam

courtesy of Barry Romo, VVAW

In this installment of Rediscovered Radio, you’ll meet a soldier who was deeply changed by what he saw and did in the Vietnam War. Barry Romo spoke at Antioch College in 1973, when students around the country were involved in anti-war activities. And a warning, this story contains language that some listeners might find disturbing.

A Model Soldier

Exploring Milestones In WYSO's Audio Archives

Nov 16, 2015
Martin Luther King's 1965 commencement speech at Antioch College
courtesy of Antiochiana

Today WYSO brings back Rediscovered Radio, our series exploring the past through the station’s historic audio collection. We’re approaching the 50-year mark on many significant events documented in our digital Audio Archives, and so we are beginning a new season of stories. WYSO Archives Fellow Jocelyn Robinson has a preview of what’s to come.

Celebrating Black Women Writers

Feb 26, 2015
courtesy of the Central State University Archives

In the mid to late 1970s, WYSO broadcast the voices of three remarkable black women writers, and these tapes are preserved in the WYSO Archives. The work of Maya Angelou, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Alice Walker still resonates today. Rediscovered Radio’s Jocelyn Robinson reflects on these writers and their work.

One of my first tasks as the WYSO Archives Fellow was to listen to hours of digitized historic tape in order to mine the collection for hidden jewels, like a recording of the unmistakable voice of Maya Angelou reading her poem Harlem Hopscotch.

Bob Moore with Faith and John Morgan in the WYSO studios. arthur morgan
Jocelyn Robinson / WYSO

A few years back, Bob Moore of Yellow Springs took his kids to the public library where he found a shelf of books by local authors. There he discovered the writing of Arthur E. Morgan. Morgan’s creative and original thinking, reflected in these volumes, aroused Bob’s curiosity; he wondered about the voice of this man who had so much influence on the history of Yellow Springs and the Miami Valley, if there were any recordings of him speaking. Bob put the question to WYSO Curious. Hear the radio broadcast here:

courtesy of Antiochiana / Antioch College

Almost 50 years ago, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Yellow Springs and Antioch College to address the graduates at his wife Coretta’s alma mater. WYSO News was there to cover the event, and this tape is one of the most significant recordings in the WYSO Archives.