WYSO

Rediscovered Radio

Robert Bly: Shaping American Literature

Feb 8, 2017
Robert Bly at Antioch College in 1968
The Record courtesy of Antiochiana / Antioch College

Poet Robert Bly visited Antioch College in 1968, the same year he won the National Book Award for a collection called The Light Around the Body.

courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

Today on Rediscovered Radio, a return to the time when the Civil Rights movement took a more militant turn toward Black Nationalism.  That change can be described best by learning the story of Stokely Carmichael. He was a young activist in the 1960s--one of the youngest jailed during Freedom Summer in 1964.  Later, Carmichael became the national chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC, and was an early member of the Black Panther party, too.

The Watts Rebellion & Watts Writers: 1965 & Today

Jan 18, 2017
Watts in the summer of 1965
New York World-Telegram / via wikimedia commons

After the Watts Rebellion in Los Angeles in 1965, something unique happened. An Academy Award-winning screenwriter visited Watts and realized the neighborhood had stories the nation needed to hear.

Archibald MacLeish
Igrimm12~commonswiki / via wikimedia commons

Today on Rediscovered Radio, we meet the American poet Archibald MacLeish whose life spanned most of the 20th century. Bob Dylan described him as a man “who could take real people from history..and with the tender touch of a creator, deliver them right to your door.” Rediscovered Radio producer Dave Barber has the story of a MacLeish visit to Antioch College. Captured on tape, it is now part of the WYSO archives.

Preserving Protest: A Look Back at Blanket Hill

Jan 10, 2017
Bullet hole left in a steel sculpture  at Kent State Universityon May 4, 1970.
Steve Grant / Flickr Creative Commons

Today on Rediscovered Radio, a return to the 1970s – when four students were killed on the Kent State University campus by national guard troops as they protested America’s involvement in the Viet Nam war.   It was one the most memorable events of the late 20th century, and the shootings set off a series of other events:  it changed Americans’ views about staying in the war – and it likely changed how the US government would handle future mass protests.  Community Voices Steve McQueen has the story from the WYSO archives.

Rediscovered Radio Flashback: AIM Comes to Yellow Springs

Jan 4, 2017
Flag of the American Indian Movement
via wikimedia commons

Hundreds of protestors including representatives from many Native American tribes are still gathered at Standing Rock, North Dakota, in their effort to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline from threatening sacred lands and water. Native people banded together in protest nearly 50 years ago, too, as Rediscovered Radio producer Jocelyn Robinson reminds us.
 

An Antioch Record article about Florynce Kennedy's appearance at the College
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

Florynce Kennedy,  an outspoken attorney and activist who bridged the Women’s Liberation and Black Power Movements in the 1960s and 70s, said “A woman without a man is like a fish without a bicycle.” She was outrageous and defiant and with her middle finger in the air and a cowboy hat on her head, she came to Antioch in 1971 to talk about fighting oppression. WYSO was there.

Cecil Taylor
Charles Rotmil / via wikimedia commons

The American jazz pianist Cecil Taylor is a pioneer of what is called free jazz—music which often discards notated scores and breaks with meter and conventional harmonic progression. Now 87, his first recordings were released in the 1950s. In the late 1960s and early 70s Taylor taught at Antioch College and recordings from his years in Yellow Springs are found in the WYSO archives.

Susan Sontag: A Cool Cultural Icon Visits Antioch

Oct 1, 2016
Juan Bastos / via wikimedia commons

In the spring of 1965, Antioch College presented a lecture series on “The Shape of Things to Come in America.” Civil rights, avant-garde music, and computers were just a few of the topics.

Writer and social critic Susan Sontag was one of the speakers. In the decades after this lecture, her books and essays would come to influence how we think about photographic images, pop culture, and illness.

By Chip.berlet (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

In 1962 an Ohio State student, a singer and guitarist named Phil Ochs, moved to New York City and was soon at the center of the booming folk music scene in Greenwich Village which included Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Peter Paul and Mary. Today Phil Ochs' music is less well known than some of his colleagues'—but it still delivers a powerful message.

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