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red light cameras

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Traffic cameras will officially be activated in Dayton next month, according to a press release issued by the city.

Red light and speed cameras at 5 major intersections could be turned on as early as Sunday, October 1. Cameras will be located on: 

 

James H. McGee Blvd. at Third St.

N. Main St. at Siebenthaler Ave. 

N. Gettysburg Ave at Fairbanks Ave.

Linden Ave at  Smithville Rd. 

S. Keowee St. between Third St. and Fifth St.  

Red Light, Speed Cameras To Operate 24/7 in Dayton

Sep 6, 2017
traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton officials are moving forward with plans to re-install red light cameras in the city, after a recent Ohio Supreme Court decision lifted tough state restrictions.

Red light and speed cameras will soon operate at five heavily trafficked intersections in Dayton. The city’s camera program has been shuttered since 2015, when state lawmakers enacted new usage regulations.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Once again, state lawmakers are trying to green light new rules for how communities can use speed and red light cameras, especially smaller communities that get a big percentage of their revenue from tickets.

Columbus Democratic Rep. Hearcel Craig is going after communities without mayors’ courts that are running traffic camera programs. He says some violations come with fines in the hundreds to thousands of dollars which he says is “abusive and excessive."

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Officials in Dayton plan to resume using cameras to catch drivers who run red lights, two years after dropping that practice to comply with Ohio restrictions and a legal battle.

The Dayton City Commission approved the program's restart in a 5-0 vote Wednesday.

City officials say speed detectors and red-light cameras will make the city safer. Police officials have said traffic crashes increased, and the number of traffic deaths doubled after the original red light cameras were removed.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The Ohio Supreme Court is hearing the city of Dayton's appeal of a law strictly limiting red-light and speed cameras in a case with statewide implications.

The court on Tuesday will hear arguments for and against the law that bans the use of red-light cameras without an officer present.

The court also has appeals on the same issue from Springfield and Toledo.

Ohio 2nd District Court of Appeals rejected Dayton's appeal in 2015, saying the new law doesn't violate the city's home-rule authority.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear a city's challenge to new rules that require a police officer to be present when an automated camera is used to issue traffic tickets.

Springfield's argument against the law was rejected by a county judge last year and the city lost an appeal earlier this year. Nearby Dayton also has an appeal pending before the state's highest court.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The City of Dayton is looking into bringing back its automated red light camera program. It ended in July 2015, after the state mandated that police officers be present in order to issue citations.

Since then, Chief Richard Biehl says traffic accidents have increased. In response, they’re now seeking proposals from camera vendors to restart the program.

“I think the argument is there that it is a very effective, and if done properly, a very fair way of doing traffic enforcement and it certainly then changes driving behavior.”

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Communities that still have red light cameras in operation right now are questioning part of the budget plan proposed by the Ohio House. There’s disagreement over a part of the bill designed to take away revenue that’s generated through those cameras.

Some cities are continuing to operate red light cameras while they sue over a new state law that restricts the usage of those devices. State Rep. Ron Maag says there’s a part of the newly proposed House budget that deals with those communities.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

Just as state lawmakers pass a bill that will likely end most traffic camera programs in Ohio, the state’s highest court has ruled cities have the authority to use those red light and speed cameras.

The lawyer for ticketed-driver Bradley Walker argued before the Ohio Supreme Court in June that Toledo’s administrative hearing process to appeal a traffic citation was unconstitutional because state lawmakers haven’t specifically allowed it. He says appeals should have to go through municipal court. Toledo Law Director Adam Loukx disagreed. 

West Carrollton Considers Levy Options

Dec 11, 2014
West Carrollton city officials are considering a tax levy to help pay for an in-house emergency dispatch center.
City of West Carrollton website

The city of West Carrollton is considering changes to its dispatching service. Officials are concerned the city is getting priced out of offering an in-house emergency call center.

If the city wants to run its own operation next year, officials are expecting it’ll cost around $800,000. City Manager Brad Townsend says that isn’t feasible without residents paying a little extra. Voters could be asked to approve a levy in May at the earliest.