Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

New Area Codes On The Horizon For Parts of Ohio

Jul 27, 2015

The central Ohio region is running out of phone numbers using the 614 area code. People who get a new phone number will soon have an all new area code to come with it. And other areas are preparing for a similar change.

The area code for any new phone numbers in the central Ohio area will be 380.

ohio.gov

The director of the state panel that regulates public utilities is stepping down from that role. But he won’t really be leaving the commission.

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Director Tom Johnson says personal reasons have led him to the decision to step down. But he does intend to stay on as a member of the commission. That term would end in four years. 

Johnson, a long time state lawmaker who became chairman last April, says he’ll stay in the top position until a replacement has been found. One of the leading contenders for that replacement could be Andre Porter.

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has created a new interactive tool that allows consumers to shop using side-by-side comparisons in an effort to help customers who want to pick electric and natural gas suppliers.

Todd Snitchler, PUCO chairman, says the new website will eliminate the confusion surrounding energy choice and equip consumers with the information needed to make the best decicion.

Ohio Regulator's Travel Expenses Raises Eyebrows

Jan 24, 2014

The group that regulates Ohio's utilities sent over 30 of its staff to a conference in Orlando before the holidays, costing utility customers $34,660. Dayton Daily News reporter Laura Bischoff examined the expenses surrounding the trip. In an interview for PoliticsOhio, she tells Emily McCord that the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) is a powerful board and that the public often doesn't know how their money is spent and where it goes.

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio regulators are proposing that companies get breaks on their electric bills for certain levels of new hiring and investment in the state.

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio spokeswoman, Beth Trombold, tells The Columbus Dispatch the plan is aimed at boosting jobs and economic development. It’s likely the rate cuts would mainly go to large businesses and that other electric customers would pay more.