Presidential Debates

Wright State President David R. Hopkins speaks to reporters
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Wright State University has dropped out of the first Presidential Debate in September citing both a fundraising shortfall and growing security concerns.

“Having a large open campus, accessible to the public, led to concerns about whether we could ensure the safety and security of those on and around our campus during the debate," said Wright State President David R. Hopkins in a press conference on Tuesday.

Wright State has also struggled to meet fundraising goals. The university budgeted $8 million for the debate and had only raised $2.5 million so far.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Wright State University is raising money for the September presidential debate.

 

This year's costs are higher than usual, according to the university. The typical price of previous debates ranged from 3 to 5 million dollars. This is Wright State’s first year hosting a presidential debate, and their goal is to raise 8 million dollars.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Cybersecurity security concerns are expected to increase Wright State University's anticipated costs for hosting the first presidential debate this fall.

The Dayton Daily News reports that officials at the school in southwest Ohio has told its board of trustees that plans call for spending around $8 million in preparation for the Sept. 26 debate.

The final cast for the Republicans’ first presidential debate Aug. 6 should be known Tuesday. 

Last week Kasich downplayed any concerns that he may or may not have about making that first debate in his home state.

“I don’t appraise my chances on that,” Kasich said. “You all know that. We’ll see what happens.”

Fox News said it will select the 10 candidates who will participate based on their average in the five most recent national polls. But Ohio Republican Party Chair Matt Borges is confident Kasich will make the cut.  

President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney have sparred aggressively in their first campaign debate over taxes, deficits and strong steps needed to create jobs in a sputtering national economy.