President Barack Obama

Campaigning together in the swing state of Ohio, GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his pick for VP, Paul Ryan laid out their plan for economic recovery. WYSO’s Jerry Kenney reports that part of their plan includes developing domestic energy sources, improving education, and balancing international trade.

Dan Damon is the anchor of BBC World Update and is visiting the state this week to take a closer look at Ohio's role for the upcoming election. He joins Emily McCord in the studio to discuss why the world watches the state, whether Ohioans are responding more to the economic messages of President Obama or Republican challenger Mitt Romney, and what Ohio Republicans are saying about the current state of Mitt Romney's campaign.

President Obama touted his plan to raise taxes on wealthier Americans and shift defense spending to help pay down the deficit. The president made his comments yesterday in one of two stops he made in the buckeye state.

President Obama says Republican Mitt Romney is promising to cut income taxes and spend trillions more on defense while, at the same time, reducing the deficit.  Mr. Obama says it’s important to note that Romney isn’t saying what he’ll cut from the federal budget in order to be able to do that.

President Barack Obama’s Heartland Bus Tour rolled through Springfield on Thursday as his re-election campaign stopped outside Springfield’s Obama for America office before heading to Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Several local VIP's spoke at the event, including Clark County Sheriff Gene Kelly and Greg Schultz, OFA-Ohio state director, targeted the state’s auto workers and farmers.

Wayne Baker

Actor Kal Penn, best known for starring in the Harold and Kumar movies, visited with students and local Obama for America-Ohio supporters Thursday afternoon at Wilberforce University.

Penn, who actually is considered the president's ambassador to young voters, discussed with the nearly 80 students and Obama supporters gathered in the student union, the choice they have to make in November's election between what he called, "two fundamentally different visions of how to grow the economy while investing in more affordable, higher education."

Wayne Baker

On Monday, Governor Tim Pawlenty attended the grand opening of the Clark County GOP headquarters.

In a room full of about 50 GOP supporters, volunteers, state and local politicians, Pawlenty talked about the reasons he felt President Obama doesn't deserve a second term.

Democrats, along with President Obama’s re-election campaign, have filed a federal lawsuit against Ohio to try to reinstate the three days of early in person voting before Election day.

In 2008, 93 thousand Ohioans voted in Ohio in the three days before the election.  Since then, Republican lawmakers have wiped out the 3 day window for most Ohioans. Only military members and their families can now take advantage of that opportunity.  Ohio Democratic Party Chair Chris Redfern says that’s not right.

President Barack Obama departs on a two-day bus tour of Ohio and Pennsylvania today, defending his economic policies and and his decision to rescue U.S. automakers while raising questions about Republican Mitt Romney's business record. 

The president's 250-mile "Betting on America" bus tour will pass through several Northern Ohio communities where he received strong support in 2008.  The tour will also take him into Western Pennsylvania, with a stop in Pittsburgh.

PoliticsOhio: Obama, Romney Campaign In Ohio

Jun 15, 2012

Ohio truly was a battleground this week, as both President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney visited the state to sell their message to voters. For this weeks PoliticsOhio, Emily McCord speaks to Jessica Wehrman who reports from Washington for the Columbus Dispatch about what both men hope to convey during their time in Ohio and what the political landscape current is in the state.

Many of us think of humanitarian intervention as a recent phenomenon of United States foreign policy. Certainly, critics of Barack Obama’s intervention in Libya saw America’s humanitarian involvement there as some new-fangled excuse to go mucking around in other countries. This month historian Jeff Bloodworth traces a much longer history of humanitarian intervention that goes back to the administration of William McKinley and is connected with the Protestant ideals of some of the nation's founders.

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