Poverty

OACAA.ORG

16% of Ohioans lived all of last year in poverty, and nearly a third were under the federal poverty line for at least some of 2015. Those are among the findings in a report from community groups that work on the front lines of the war on poverty in Ohio.

Race- and Ethnicity-Adjusted Life Expectancy by Commuting Zone and Income Quartile, 2001-2014  Estimates of race- and ethnicity-adjusted expected age at death for 40-year-olds computed by commuting zone. The 595 commuting zones with populations above 25 0
Journal of the American Medical Association

This week, the American Medical Association published an extensive report affirming the relationship between poverty and life expectancy.

 

According to the report in the Journal of the American Medical Association, higher incomes are associated with greater longevity—that’s not necessarily new information, but they say there’s a gap of about 14 years life expectancy between the richest 1% and the poorest 1% of individuals.

 

Joanne Viskup

For some high school kids, figuring out a plan after senior years is as simple as apply to college and go, or start looking for a job.

But plenty of teenagers are facing issues a lot of adults would struggle with, financial and family pressures that make just getting to graduation tough—let alone, looking ahead.

Pete "comedy_nose" / Flickr/Creative Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An analysis of recent student test results in Ohio shows the continuing role of poverty in the scores.

The study was released Tuesday by the Ohio School Boards Association, Buckeye Association of School Administrators and Ohio Association of School Business Officials.

A U.S. Census Bureau report released this week says the rate in Dayton was 17.3 percent in 2014, an increase of nearly a full percentage point from 2013.

The numbers mean that more than 134,000 Dayton residents were living below the poverty level last year, which is about $20,000 for a family of three.

The 17 percent poverty rate closely matches Ohio’s 16.9 percent food insecurity rate. Michelle Riley is with The Foodbank, a distribution group that delivers food supplies to 96 member agencies in Montgomery, Greene and Preble Counties.

Faith leaders and advocates for the poor are calling on the federal government to do something to reform payday lending.

An advocate for the homeless in Central Ohio says Ohio’s laws that crack down on payday lenders have been ineffective at curbing some of the predatory lending practices. Bill Faith says payday lenders are finding ways to get around those new laws by using other areas of Ohio’s lending laws.

“They have exploited those loopholes and we have tried multiple ways to close those loopholes,” he said.

The panel of state lawmakers looking over the budget had questions during a House Finance Committee meeting Wednesday about Medicaid, including about a proposal to require almost 100,000 Ohioans making above the federal poverty level to pay premiums. 

State Medicaid Director John McCarthy said the premiums will be $20 a month, which he said will teach recipients about monthly payments when they make enough money to buy insurance on the federal marketplace. 

LollyKnit / Flickr/Creative Commons

Hunger and food insecurity are still major problems in the Miami Valley even as the economic recovery gradually gets more people working. The Foodbank of the Miami Valley says it’s doing better meeting local residents’ needs than it was four years ago. That’s the last time a group called Feeding America did its periodic national survey of food banks and their users.

Dayton Residents Call For “Robin Hood Tax”

Apr 4, 2014
Protesters in downtown Dayton wore Robin Hood hats.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A group of protesters gathered in front of Ohio Congressman Mike Turner’s Dayton office Friday to call for the passage of a so-called “Robin Hood tax.” The demonstration is one of several across the country timed with the anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination in 1968.

The House of Representatives passed a compromise farm bill Wednesday, which among other provisions will makes some cuts to food stamps. The deal includes $8.6 billion in cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

 In a conversation with WYSO's Emily McCord, Senator Sherrod Brown says the bill isn’t perfect, but it’s a lot better than the $40 billion cut Republicans originally wanted and that legislation will grow the agricultural industry.

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