WYSO

Poverty

A city program that transformed parking meters into brightly colored charitable donations sites has announced its collection totals from its first year of operation. Real Change Dayton launched last summer to help people struggling with homelessness and cut down on panhandling.

 

Activists protest Dayton's pedestrian safety ordinance at city commission meeting held May 23.
April Laissle / WYSO

The Dayton City Commission recently passed a law effectively banning panhandling along 51 major roadways. It’s not the first time the city has passed laws curbing the practice. Now, some legal advocates are already raising questions about the city’s new pedestrian safety ordinance.

At the May 23 city commission meeting, Mayor Nan Whaley was clear: the ordinance is not about panhandling.

“Nothing in this ordinance criminalizes holding a sign on the side of a roadway,” the mayor said.

Dayton's officials are coming up against some unknowns in the budget process for next year.
Derek Jensen / Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Dayton is again exploring ways to ban panhandling along major city highways. At a meeting Wednesday evening, the city commission is expected to review an ordinance that would criminalize the practice.

Dayton first introduced legislation to restrict panhandling in 2011. That law required panhandlers to register with the city, and restricted begging to daylight hours. It also allowed cops to arrest violators instead of just citing them.

After legal challenges, the law was partially repealed in 2016.

Commentary: Economic De-segregation In The Miami Valley

Sep 18, 2017
school desks
Historic Breman / Flickr Creative Commons

Last summer, a nonprofit called EdBuild examined child poverty rate disparities between neighboring school districts. They then ranked neighboring school districts from largest to smallest disparities. Of the top ten largest disparities in the US, two of them were in the Miami Valley. Danielle Rhubart is a lecturer and sociologist at University of Dayton. She studies poverty in urban and rural communities and brings us this commentary - about why poverty disparity matters and how to fix it.

food in grocery store
MASAHIRO IHARA / Flickr Creative Commons

The House of Bread community kitchen in West Dayton has been feeding area residents and families in need for more than 30 years. Now, the nonprofit is close to reaching its goal in a major capital campaign aimed at expanding its existing facility.

House of Bread has already raised about $800,000 toward its overall goal of $1.4 million.

Executive director Melodie Bennett says all funds raised in the campaign will be used to expand the organization’s now-overcrowded dining room facilities.

Advocates from anti-hunger groups say President Donald Trump’s $1.15 trillion budget proposal would hurt the neediest Ohioans most. The president’s budget would boost spending for the Pentagon and make a down payment on a United States-Mexico border wall, while cutting funds for many domestic programs, including anti-poverty programs that help needy families across the Miami Valley.

OACAA.ORG

16% of Ohioans lived all of last year in poverty, and nearly a third were under the federal poverty line for at least some of 2015. Those are among the findings in a report from community groups that work on the front lines of the war on poverty in Ohio.

Race- and Ethnicity-Adjusted Life Expectancy by Commuting Zone and Income Quartile, 2001-2014  Estimates of race- and ethnicity-adjusted expected age at death for 40-year-olds computed by commuting zone. The 595 commuting zones with populations above 25 0
Journal of the American Medical Association

This week, the American Medical Association published an extensive report affirming the relationship between poverty and life expectancy.

 

According to the report in the Journal of the American Medical Association, higher incomes are associated with greater longevity—that’s not necessarily new information, but they say there’s a gap of about 14 years life expectancy between the richest 1% and the poorest 1% of individuals.

 

Joanne Viskup

For some high school kids, figuring out a plan after senior years is as simple as apply to college and go, or start looking for a job.

But plenty of teenagers are facing issues a lot of adults would struggle with, financial and family pressures that make just getting to graduation tough—let alone, looking ahead.

Pete "comedy_nose" / Flickr/Creative Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An analysis of recent student test results in Ohio shows the continuing role of poverty in the scores.

The study was released Tuesday by the Ohio School Boards Association, Buckeye Association of School Administrators and Ohio Association of School Business Officials.

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