WYSO

pollution

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The City of Dayton water department says it’s considering feedback from the public and businesses on a proposal to change the city’s drinking water protections.

The city’s water system, which serves 400,000 people including customers in Kettering, Vandalia, Riverside, Trotwood and Brookville, pumps water from two industrial parts of Dayton. Since the late 80s, city zoning laws have limited the hazardous chemicals companies can have in those areas.

Collin O'Mara, President of the National Wildlife Federation, held up a glass of algae-filled water from Lake Erie after the toxins produced by the algae shut down Toledo's water system.
National Wildlife Federation Staff

Nothing brings consensus like a crisis. During Toledo’s recent drinking-water ban, conflicting ideas about how to test for toxins caused confusion for decision-makers, and hat problem sparked rare, swift action by multiple layers of government to create a uniform, statewide protocol.

Jeffrey Simmons speaks to representatives from the City of Dayton water department.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

About 20 people spoke out at a public meeting Monday on Dayton’s proposal to revise its drinking water protections. Almost all the speakers opposed the plan, which would reduce the most stringently protected area by 40 percent.

Signs around the Miami Valley demarcate the boundaries of the well fields and source water protection areas.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The first of two public hearings is taking place Monday, July 14 on possible changes to Dayton’s drinking water protection program. Drinking water for more than 400,000 people in Montgomery and parts of Greene County comes from two wellfields that tap into the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, a shallow sand and gravel aquifer that is vulnerable to contamination from surface spills.

Ohio Plays Ping-Pong With EPA Carbon Regulations

Jun 3, 2014
Coal is shipped by barge down the Ohio River.
MoToMo / Flickr

A bill that puts the state’s renewable energy standards on hold for two years is headed to Ohio governor John Kasich’s desk. That comes just as the federal government has proposed new limits on emissions from power plants.

A map from the EPA shows the boundaries of the current investigation in Riverside: Hypathia Avenue on the east, Rohrer Boulevard on the west, Guernsey Dell and Minnesota Avenues on the north and Valley Pike Street on the south.
USEPA Region V

  A problem with pollution in Riverside is more widespread than environmental protection officials originally thought. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has already inspected approximately 110 homes for toxic vapors, and found problems in more than half. In December WYSO reported the EPA would be testing dozens of homes after being contacted by the Ohio EPA to assist; the area to be inspected has since expanded by several blocks.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The City of Moraine is asking voters to approve a .5 percent increase to its municipal income tax in the Tuesday, May 6 primary election. Moraine City Manager David Hicks says the south Dayton town is in a tough spot financially—and still dealing with empty buildings and polluted superfund sites years after the departure of industry that created it.

Mark Mazzei is caring for 64 salamanders at the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery. They were rescued from the site of a March 17, 2014 oil spill in Oak Glen Nature Preserve.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A group of salamanders is recovering at Dayton’s Boonshoft Museum after being removed from the site of an oil spill north of Cincinnati last month. The Mid-Valley pipeline, which is operated by Sunoco Logistics, leaked at least 19,000 gallons of oil into the Oak Glen Nature Preserve. The pipeline runs from Texas to Michigan through Ohio, and WYSO found it’s one of the leakiest in the country.

 

Landfill Controversy Subject Of Public Forum

Apr 9, 2014

A public forum Wednesday in Springfield is the latest in an ongoing debate over how to clean up a Clark County landfill. Residents have been at odds with the US Environmental Protection Agency for years over how to clean 300,000 gallons of industrial waste at the Tremont City landfill.

Now, The EPA is sending a third party to address their concerns.

Beavercreeksfinest.com

A federal court has issued a decision in a decades-old case about Lammers Barrel Factory, a pollution site in Beavercreek. A list of thirty-seven companies have agreed to clean up the vacant lot, which was contaminated sometime in the 1950s or 1960s with volatile organic compounds, which can be toxic if consumed through drinking water or vapor intrusion.

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