Ohio Unemployment

State lawmakers will freeze benefits for unemployed workers at current levels while putting plans for a major overhaul of Ohio's unemployment compensation system on hold

Republican leaders in Columbus said Tuesday that they'll take another shot next year at completing the overhaul of the state's unemployment fund.

They hope freezing the current rates will give them time to craft a broad solution.

Ohio House of Representatives

A group of state lawmakers will be studying jobless benefits to come up with ideas for their colleagues to consider when they come back to work after the November election. 

Ohio has paid back the $1.4 billion it borrowed from the federal government during the recession when the fund that paid benefits to jobless workers went broke. But Republican Rep. Kirk Schuring of Stark County says the crisis isn’t over.

“When you’re in a situation like this, it begs the question: What must we do to reform our system?”

Ohio's privatized economic-development agency says in its annual report that it's created a record 23,602 jobs last year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that JobsOhio also attracted $6.7 billion in corporate investment last year, increasing the agency's percentage of both jobs landed and investments made by approximately 10 percent compared to 2014.

State Faces Massive Unemployment Debt

Sep 12, 2014
A hearing in Clark County Tuesday brought state legislators and policy advocates together to strategize on addressing Ohio's unemployment debt.
Wayne Baker / WYSO

Ohio legislators are trying to figure out how to pay down almost $1.4 billion in debt to the federal government for the state's unemployment fund. Ohio's Unemployment Compensation Study Committee held a hearing in Clark County Tuesday to address concerns about the fund. 

The state borrowed lots of money from the federal government during the Great Recession to make up for shortfalls in its unemployment fund. 

The logo for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services
WOSU

State and national jobless numbers are closely watched as economic indicators, and the unemployment figures can also give useful clues for those seeking their first full-time job.

Last month, 323,000 Ohio adults were actively seeking work and not able to find a job, and the unemployment rate crept up for the first time in several months. The figure includes recent high school and college graduates looking for that first job, or an entry level job.

The monthly Ohio unemployment report scheduled for Friday will be delayed because of the federal government shutdown. That means residents and employers will have to wait to find out whether the slight uptick in the state jobless rate for August continued last month.

The Columbus Dispatch says the state compiles the report using data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau. The shutdown is affecting both agencies.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

Unemployment numbers are out for August, and Ohio’s rate was right in line with the national rate of 7.3 percent. But while the U.S. unemployment rate went from above 8 percent in August 2012 to 7.3 percent in August 2013, the state numbers actually ticked up slightly from last month and last year.

Ohio's unemployment rate remained unchanged at 7 percent for May.

State officials released the new number Friday morning. The rate was the same as April, after falling from 7.1 percent the two previous months.

The Ohio rate has consistently remained below the national level. The U.S. unemployment rate for May was 7.6 percent.

The state's leaders have said Ohio's economy and its job market are getting stronger, though the process is slow. 

The latest monthly jobs data shows that Ohio's unemployment rate rose slightly in January.

The Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services said Friday that the state's seasonably adjusted unemployment rate for January was 7 percent - up from 6.7 in December.

The slip reversed a trend of incremental progress in lowering the rate over a number of months. The state has said Ohio's economy and its job market are getting stronger, but the process is slow.

Ohio's unemployment rate has remained about a percentage point below the U.S. rate.
 
 

Ohio's unemployment rate is continuing to inch downward.

The Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services said Friday that the state's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for November was 6.8 percent. That's down from 6.9 percent in October and 7.1 percent in September.

It's the lowest since an identical 6.8-percent rate in August 2008.

The state has said Ohio's economy and its job market are getting stronger, though the process is slow.

Ohio's unemployment rate has remained about a full percentage point below the U.S. rate.
 

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