Ohio Unemployment

A hearing in Clark County Tuesday brought state legislators and policy advocates together to strategize on addressing Ohio's unemployment debt.
Wayne Baker / WYSO

Ohio legislators are trying to figure out how to pay down almost $1.4 billion in debt to the federal government for the state's unemployment fund. Ohio's Unemployment Compensation Study Committee held a hearing in Clark County Tuesday to address concerns about the fund. 

The state borrowed lots of money from the federal government during the Great Recession to make up for shortfalls in its unemployment fund. 

The logo for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services
WOSU

State and national jobless numbers are closely watched as economic indicators, and the unemployment figures can also give useful clues for those seeking their first full-time job.

Last month, 323,000 Ohio adults were actively seeking work and not able to find a job, and the unemployment rate crept up for the first time in several months. The figure includes recent high school and college graduates looking for that first job, or an entry level job.

The monthly Ohio unemployment report scheduled for Friday will be delayed because of the federal government shutdown. That means residents and employers will have to wait to find out whether the slight uptick in the state jobless rate for August continued last month.

The Columbus Dispatch says the state compiles the report using data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau. The shutdown is affecting both agencies.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

Unemployment numbers are out for August, and Ohio’s rate was right in line with the national rate of 7.3 percent. But while the U.S. unemployment rate went from above 8 percent in August 2012 to 7.3 percent in August 2013, the state numbers actually ticked up slightly from last month and last year.

Ohio's unemployment rate remained unchanged at 7 percent for May.

State officials released the new number Friday morning. The rate was the same as April, after falling from 7.1 percent the two previous months.

The Ohio rate has consistently remained below the national level. The U.S. unemployment rate for May was 7.6 percent.

The state's leaders have said Ohio's economy and its job market are getting stronger, though the process is slow. 

The latest monthly jobs data shows that Ohio's unemployment rate rose slightly in January.

The Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services said Friday that the state's seasonably adjusted unemployment rate for January was 7 percent - up from 6.7 in December.

The slip reversed a trend of incremental progress in lowering the rate over a number of months. The state has said Ohio's economy and its job market are getting stronger, but the process is slow.

Ohio's unemployment rate has remained about a percentage point below the U.S. rate.
 
 

Ohio's unemployment rate is continuing to inch downward.

The Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services said Friday that the state's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for November was 6.8 percent. That's down from 6.9 percent in October and 7.1 percent in September.

It's the lowest since an identical 6.8-percent rate in August 2008.

The state has said Ohio's economy and its job market are getting stronger, though the process is slow.

Ohio's unemployment rate has remained about a full percentage point below the U.S. rate.
 

Ohio’s official unemployment has dropped once again and it now at 6.9%.  The October rate represents a drop of only two-tenths of 1% compared to the revised rate in September.

Still, it means Ohio now has its lowest jobless rate in more than four years.  You have to go back to August of 2008 to find a jobless rate in the same 6% range. 

Ohio is facing a catch-22. Because the state's official unemployment rate has dropped to a full percentage point below the national average, the federal government is cutting back its share of emergency unemployment benefits to jobless Ohioans.

Ben Johnson, with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, says people will notice the cutback at the beginning of December.

Numbers released Friday by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services show the seasonally adjusted rate of joblessness at 7.2 percent for the second consecutive month, although there were modest gains in hiring. It's still the lowest level since September 2008.


The unchanged percentage rate in July stalled 11 consecutive months of decreases in Ohio's jobless rate. Compared with June's figures, the state's non-farm payrolls grew by 11,000.