Ohio Supreme Court

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

Just as state lawmakers pass a bill that will likely end most traffic camera programs in Ohio, the state’s highest court has ruled cities have the authority to use those red light and speed cameras.

The lawyer for ticketed-driver Bradley Walker argued before the Ohio Supreme Court in June that Toledo’s administrative hearing process to appeal a traffic citation was unconstitutional because state lawmakers haven’t specifically allowed it. He says appeals should have to go through municipal court. Toledo Law Director Adam Loukx disagreed. 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Supreme Court has upheld a death sentence for a Cincinnati man convicted of killing his ex-girlfriend and two young children.

Mark Pickens was sentenced to die in 2010 after a jury found him guilty in the shootings of 19-year-old Noelle Washington, her infant son and a 3-year-old girl she was babysitting a year earlier.

The court's ruling issued Tuesday rejected Pickens' arguments that questioned testimony at the trial and how the jurors were selected.

Pickens was 19 at the time of the shootings.

Republican Ohio Supreme Court Justice Judith French has held onto her seat in one of the year's toughest races.

The former Tenth District Court of Appeals judge turned back a challenge from Democrat John P. O'Donnell, a Cuyahoga County Common Pleas judge. O'Donnell drew late criticism for breaking a clean campaign pledge with a negative TV ad.

French was appointed to the seven-member high court in 2012 by Republican Gov. John Kasich. She acknowledged she was concerned O'Donnell's Irish surname would play better with voters than the name French.

Republican Sharon Kennedy has been re-elected to the Ohio Supreme Court by defeating Democratic state Rep. Tom Letson.

Kennedy was first elected as one of the high court's seven members in 2012. Before that, she was an administrative judge on the Butler County Domestic Relations Court, a magistrate and a warrant officer.

The 52-year-old from Liberty Township was endorsed by the Ohio affiliates of the National Rifle Association, Fraternal Order of Police, Chamber of Commerce and National Federation of Independent Business, among others.

Ohio Court To Hear Former Death Row Inmate's Claim

Jun 25, 2014

The Ohio Supreme Court has accepted the appeal of a former death row inmate trying to clear his name in a pair of slayings he didn't commit.

Dale Johnston of suburban Columbus was sentenced to die in 1984 for the shooting deaths of his teenage stepdaughter and her fiance two years earlier.

The case against him fell apart on appeal, and he was freed in 1990. Another man confessed in 2008 to killing the couple.

Two years ago, a Franklin County judge declared the 80-year-old Johnston innocent in the slayings, allowing him to seek compensation from the state.

Now that the Ohio Supreme Court has made a decision on Medicaid expansion, it appears it’s here to stay - at least for now.  After the Medicaid expansion vote before the Controlling Board in October, the lawsuit was filed and then was fast-tracked to get a ruling by the end of the year so there were no oral arguments before the justices. Four of them agreed that the Controlling Board had the authority to approve spending $2.5 billion federal dollars on Medicaid expansion. The other three dissenting justices wanted to dismiss the case.

As the weather gets colder, there are more than a few Ohioans who are right now planning their annual extended stays in Florida or other warm climates. But there's a complicated case in the Ohio Supreme Court which hopes to answer the question where a person who has two homes actually lives.

JobsOhio: Who Can Challenge It?

Nov 8, 2013
Karen Kasler, Ohio Public Radio

Governor Kasich’s private job creation entity, JobsOhio, has been at the center of controversy since it began. Because it's partially a private board, it's free from some of the regulations and public scrutiny that government organizations face.

A lawsuit that challenges the constitutionality of JobsOhio was brought before the Ohio Supreme Court this week. But as Ohio Public Radio's Karen Kasler tells Emily McCord, before that decision can be made, the question of who is allowed to sue JobsOhio must be settled first.

Supreme Court of Ohio

On Monday, August 26th, the Greater Dayton League of Women Voters will honor several “first ladies of Dayton.” Ohio’s first female Supreme Court Justice, Maureen O’Connor, will be the keynote speaker at the Women’s Equality Celebration at the Dayton Marriott. 

Among the women who will be honored at the dinner are Vickie Hensley, Dayton’s first female police Sergeant, and Rhine McLin, Dayton's first female mayor.

The Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court has a plan that she thinks will reform the process of electing justices. Justice Maureen O’Connor says she’d like to keep party affiliation of judges off the ballot in primary and general elections. And she wants Ohio to start placing judicial races at the top of the ticket, hoping that doing so will lead to more voter participation in those races. O’Connor also wonders whether it might be best to move Judicial races to odd numbered years so they get more attention from voters.