Ohio Legislature

A group of Democratic lawmakers in Ohio say domestic-violence deaths can be prevented by taking guns away from people served with restraining orders.

Legislation introduced by Rep. Bob Hagan, a Youngstown Democrat, would require those subject to domestic-violence protection orders to temporarily give up their weapons to law enforcement within 24 hours of being served.

The bill would also give defendants the option to sell their weapons to a licensed federal dealer instead of handing them over.

Ohio prosecutors say they're not giving up in their efforts to pass a law that would allow them to demand that criminal defendants undergo a trial by jury.

The proposal by the Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association targets defendants suspected of waiving their rights to a jury trial because they believe a judge will be more sympathetic.

Prosecutors want the ability to demand a jury trial if they believe a judge is biased in favor of the defendant.

Connecticut Shooting Leads to Examination of Ohio Gun Laws

Dec 17, 2012

With the shootings in Connecticut fresh in mind, members of faith community in Ohio are speaking out.  The Rev. Tracey Lind at Trinity Cathedral in Cleveland is leading the charge against a loosening of gun restrictions.

Many pastors throughout Northeast Ohio Sunday began their sermons with prayers for the 28 people who died last Friday, 20 of them 6- and 7-year olds. But Tracey Lind quickly switched gears to talk about an Ohio bill lawmakers passed Thursday, which is awaiting Gov. John Kasich’s signature.

A bipartisan proposal to change the way Ohio draws state legislative and congressional lines has cleared the state Senate with almost unanimous support.

The resolution would create a seven-member commission to draw all maps, and at least one minority party member would have to approve the boundaries.

The House isn't expected to act on the proposal and that chamber's vote is needed to put the measure before voters.

Sen. Frank LaRose, a co-sponsor, said the Senate plan could serve as a roadmap for discussion next year.

The Ohio House has passed a bill to require training and certification for a new group of professionals who will be available to guide consumers through the new health insurance exchange.

The measure cleared Wednesday on a 56-32 vote, and it now heads to the Senate.

These so-called health navigators will help educate consumers and small businesses about the new online markets created by the federal health care law. Through these exchanges, consumers will be able to buy individual private policies and apply for government subsidies to help pay their premiums.

The so-called "Heartbeat Bill" is dead in this session of the legislature, according to Republican Senate president Tom Niehaus. But its backers say they won't give up, and are still hoping for a last-minute maneuver to get it to the Senate floor before the end of the year. But one supporter of restrictions on abortion who's not getting involved is Gov. John Kasich.

"I let the legislature do its job, and then I respond.  I try not to wade into the legislature," says Kasich.  "I don't get in the middle of legislative activity."

Environmental activists and consumer advocates are breathing a sigh of relief. Ohio lawmakers apparently are NOT going to change the state’s energy efficiency program during the last days of the current legislative session.

The program requires electric companies to lower overall power usage by giving money to people and businesses that buy energy-saving appliances and equipment. To fund the program, all electricity customers pay a surcharge on their monthly electric bills.

Sponsors say a bill passed by the Ohio House would give school districts more flexibility in making up snow days and other lost time.

The bill would change state law regarding the time students must spend in school. It would require them to spend a minimum number of hours in school each year instead of a minimum number of days.

House Bill 191 changes the minimum school year from 182 days to 455 hours for half-day kindergarten, 910 hours for grades one through six, and 1001 hours for grades seven through 12.

Ohio consumer advocates and environmentalists have been worrying out loud that state legislators might water down or wipe out a 4-year old program that encourages electricity customers to be more energy-efficient. Now, as statehouse correspondent Bill Cohen reports --- some comments by the top man in the Ohio Senate show those activists have good REASON to worry.

An Ohio house committee has recommended a bill that would re-prioritize funding for family planning services so that Planned Parenthood would be last on the list.

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