Ohio EPA

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The Pineview Estates mobile home park was recently without water yet again, despite help from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

 

The water system at the park has been unreliable for years, and landlord Timothy Dearwester still hadn’t made an effort to fix it, despite being asked to by the Ohio EPA and a Montgomery County Court judge. The Attorney General’s office is seeking to put Dearwester in jail for failing to comply.

Imagine you wake up and go to get in the shower, or brush your teeth, and there’s nothing coming out of the tap. Imagine this happens with no notice, and sometimes goes on for days.

Well, this scenario is real—and we’re not talking about Flint or any city water system. It turns out trailer parks across the country have problems with unreliable water.

 

In An Ohio Town, Officials Waited Months To Disclose Dangerous Lead Levels

Jan 29, 2016

At the community center in tiny Sebring, Ohio, it’s clear there’s something going on. There are trucks from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. People are wearing official-looking fluorescent yellow jackets. The Red Cross is here. And residents are picking up bottled water.

 

New Climate Change Plan Gives Ohio Until 2030 To Cut Emissions

Aug 4, 2015
Analogue Kid / via Wikimedia Commons Creative Commons licensing

The White House has come out with a sweeping strategy meant to mitigate the effects of climate change. The so-called Clean Power Plan requires every state to play a role in cutting carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.

Ohio gets 70 percent of its electricity from coal. The plan calls on the state to reduce its carbon emissions by about 28 percent by 2030. Environmental groups say the plan will go a long way toward curbing greenhouse gases. 

But Christian Palich with the Ohio Coal Association says the plan will hurt the state. 

The group People for Safe Water held a public forum in Springfield this week to voice concerns over the Environmental Protection Agency's refusal to stick with its original cleanup plan for the Tremont City Barrel Fill.
 

The U.S. EPA stated in 2010 that they would clean up the Tremont City landfill by removing all of the 300,000 gallons of hazardous waste from the site for close to $55 million, but subsequently changed its plan. The new remedy calls for reburying some of the waste and empty drums for about half that.

Residents and local officials in the village of Tremont City are challenging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Ohio EPA over the cleanup of a landfill.  Clark County residents are voicing their opposition on a plan developed by the U.S. EPA to clean up nearly 300,000 gallons of industrial waste that has been buried at the Tremont City landfill Superfund site since the late 1970s.

EPA Begins Toxic Vapor Sampling In Riverside

Dec 18, 2013
A map from the EPA shows the boundaries of the current investigation in Riverside: Hypathia Avenue on the east, Rohrer Boulevard on the west, Guernsey Dell and Minnesota Avenues on the north and Valley Pike Street on the south.
USEPA Region V

    

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has started testing dozens of homes in the north Dayton suburb of Riverside for dangerous airborne pollution. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are toxic industrial degreasers that were used with little regulation until the 1970s, when people began to suspect links to cancer.

Flickr Creative Commons user Bill Herndon

The Ohio EPA official who recently resigned is serving the last day of his tenure Friday. George Elmaraghy sent a letter in August telling employees the Kasich administration wanted him gone due to pressure from the coal industry. Ohio Public Radio's Andy Chow has been following the story and spoke to Emily McCord for PoliticsOhio.

Emily McCord: Bring us up to speed on the situation surround George Elmaraghy’s resignation in August.

Environmental Groups Call for Audit of Ohio EPA Permits

Sep 10, 2013

The Sierra Club and the Ohio Environmental Council want federal agents to take a closer look at the permits distributed by the Ohio EPA to coal companies and the relationship between the two entities.

Their call for an audit comes in light of the recent resignation of the Ohio EPA’s Division of Surface Water chief.

The chief, George Elmaraghy, said in an email to his staff last month that he was forced to resign by Governor John Kasich and Ohio EPA Director Scott Nally due to pressure from the coal industry.

Ohio environmental officials will begin studying the Stillwater River watershed this year to monitor the quality of the river that passes through parts of Ohio and Indiana.

The state scenic river is part of the Great Miami River watershed. It flows 67 miles from its headwaters in Indiana and northern Darke County in western Ohio through Miami County to the Great Miami River in Dayton.