Ohio Department of Education

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Many Ohio school districts have improved their reading scores after complying with the state’s new Third Grade Reading Guarantee. Some local districts did better than others.

The Third Grade Reading Guarantee is just over a year old. The law requires schools to provide extra help for struggling readers in kindergarten through third grade. And, it holds students back in third grade if they don’t pass a reading test at the end of the year.

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Nearly nine out of ten Ohio third graders have passed the state’s third grade reading test, which allows them to move on to fourth grade—but Dayton scored among the worst in the state.

Eighty-eight percent of the 110,000 kids who took the test statewide passed this spring. That’s up from a little over 63 percent who passed the test in the fall.

The Ohio Department of Education says it's almost done reviewing how altered attendance data affected state report cards for schools in eight districts.

The Northridge district in Montgomery County and Winton Woods in Hamilton County  are among those that will get recalculated district and school report cards for the 2010-2011 school year once the investigation is finished.

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The Ohio Department of Education released report cards for Ohio’s schools Thursday.  The 2013 report cards rate schools and buildings in the first nine of 18 new performance criteria. The new assessment system features letter grades that the DOE says are more familiar to people. 

According to Ohio's top public schools official, Superintendent Richard Ross, no district received all As or all Fs, but in the first round of new scores - districts did fall at all points on the scale.  He said tougher performance standards will make Ohio's schools better and state more competitive.

Ohio's top public schools official says no district received all As on Ohio's new A-F report cards, and none received all Fs.

Superintendent Richard Ross told reporters ahead of Thursday's release of the first round of new scores that districts instead fell at all points on the scale.

The 2013 report cards rate schools and buildings in the first nine of 18 new performance criteria. Districts and buildings won't receive overall letter grades until 2015.

After a 6 month delay Ohio school officials (today) released school report cards for 2011-2012. The state’s data scrubbing investigation delayed the report cards. The investigation continues to cast a cloud on some grades.

Finally, Ohioans get to see their schools’ ratings in the nice, clean PDF format they’re used to, instead of those confusing and incomplete spreadsheets the Department of Education released in the fall.

The Ohio Department of Education says it's ready to release school districts' long-awaited report cards now that a review of attendance data practices has been released.

The report cards for the 2011-2012 school year should have been published last summer but were delayed because of a state investigation into districts' enrollment policies.

Education Department spokesman John Charlton said Monday the report cards and other school rankings will be released by month's end.

The number of lower-income school children in Ohio receiving free or reduced-price lunches has decreased for the first time in six years.

Numbers from the Ohio Department of Education showed that nearly 820,000 youngsters get subsidized meals this school year. That's 44.4 percent - a slight decline from the 45.3 percent enrolled in the program last year.

The school-lunch program is funded by the federal government. It serves students considered to be economically disadvantaged based on their family income.

The state has kicked off the first of five days of regional training meant to teach Ohio educators to respond to school shooting situations.

More than 200 people registered to participate in Thursday's training in Columbus, where the instructor told participants that planning and practicing responses for an intruder situation will save lives in case of a real incident.

The Ohio Board of Education has approved a policy on how educators seclude and physically restrain students in schools.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the rules in effect beginning next school year allow for students to be physically restrained or put in seclusion rooms only if they're a danger to themselves or others. The plan is meant to ensure those tactics aren't used for a child's punishment or for the staff's convenience.