Obamacare

Antwaun Brown is currently uninsured, and doesn't know yet whether he'll be able to get covered by the ACA. medicaid insurance health
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Governor John Kasich will bring a Medicaid expansion proposal to the Ohio Controlling Board Monday. He’s gone around the Republican-run legislature in an attempt to approve billions in funds from the federal Affordable Care Act, and health coverage for hundreds of thousands of low-income people hangs in the balance.

When Amy Sylvester shows up at her appointment at Five Rivers Health Center in Dayton, she’s been up all night, because she works a 2am shift delivering papers.

Ohio Governor John Kasich announced last week he’ll circumvent the legislature to try to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act. Meanwhile, state legislators are considering two separate Medicaid reform bills—and health care providers have their fingers crossed.

Openclipart/Inky2010

  Congressman Mike Turner (OH-10th) has voted with the majority of other House Republicans in favor of a 2014 budget that would defund the Affordable Care Act. Republican congressmen pushed for the bill with the knowledge the Senate and the President would reject it, and in the final days of the fiscal year, the controversy devolved into a showdown, and finally to a partial shutdown of the federal government for the first time in 17 years. As of Thursday, Oct. 3, that shutdown was still underway with no end in sight.

WYSO spoke to Rep. Turner Thursday morning.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

The federal health care marketplace, a key provision of the Affordable Care Act, opened for business Tuesday even in the midst of a government shutdown. But for groups doing outreach in Dayton, the first day was a slow one.

A crew of outreach workers stood around next to colorful tables in the parking lot of a health center Tuesday, chatting up passers-by and waiting for a mostly-absent news media to stop by.

The Federal health care Marketplace is set to open for business Tuesday, Oct. 1, and open enrollment will last for six months. Most people who can’t get employer insurance will be required to sign up for health plans under the Affordable Care Act, or pay a fee. But there’s still a lot of confusion about what exactly this will mean for the uninsured — about 1.5 million people in Ohio.

Flickr/vistavision

This week the Affordable Care Act has inspired congressional faceoffs, online poetry, and a reading of "Green Eggs and Ham" on the Senate floor. Meanwhile, the federal government is scrambling to get ready for the launch of the marketplace, where Ohio’s uninsured will shop for health plans.

The federal health care marketplace is set to open Oct. 1, and Ohio organizations are scrambling to prepare. Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, almost all Americans will be required to have health care either through an employer, through a private insurer, or through a state- or federally-run marketplace. The marketplaces will essentially be regulated online shopping centers where consumers can compare health plans and find out whether they qualify for federal subsidies.

Catholic leaders in Ohio are joining the chorus of church officials urging parishioners to protest and pray about the federal government's decision to require many church-affiliated institutions to cover free birth control for
employees.

Bishops in Cincinnati, Cleveland and Toledo shared their opposition in letters distributed or read to parishioners this weekend, saying the decision runs counter to their beliefs.

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